246 - Gifted Child Quarterly http/gcq.sagepub.com What...

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http://gcq.sagepub.com Gifted Child Quarterly DOI: 10.1177/0016986207302719 2007; 51; 246 Gifted Child Quarterly D. Betsy McCoach and Del Siegle What Predicts Teachers' Attitudes Toward the Gifted? http://gcq.sagepub.com/cgi/content/abstract/51/3/246 The online version of this article can be found at: Published by: http://www.sagepublications.com On behalf of: National Association for Gifted Children can be found at: Gifted Child Quarterly Additional services and information for http://gcq.sagepub.com/cgi/alerts Email Alerts: http://gcq.sagepub.com/subscriptions Subscriptions: http://www.sagepub.com/journalsReprints.nav Reprints: http://www.sagepub.com/journalsPermissions.nav Permissions: http://gcq.sagepub.com/cgi/content/refs/51/3/246 Citations by Katherine Prammer on April 21, 2009 http://gcq.sagepub.com Downloaded from
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246 Gifted Child Quarterly Volume 51 Number 3 Summer 2007 246-255 © 2007 National Association for Gifted Children 10.1177/0016986207302719 http://gcq.sagepub.com hosted at http://online.sagepub.com What Predicts Teachers’Attitudes Toward the Gifted? D. Betsy McCoach Del Siegle University of Connecticut Abstract: The present study explores teachers’ attitudes toward the gifted and gifted education. Specifically, the authors examine whether teachers tailor their responses about attitudes toward the gifted to fit the perceived interests of the researcher. In addition, the authors examine several potential predictors of attitudes toward the gifted: training or experience in gifted education, training or experience in special education, and self-perceptions as gifted. A total of 262 teachers participate in the study. The perceived epistemic interests of the researcher do not affect teachers’ self- reported attitudes toward the gifted. Teachers who had received training in gifted education hold higher perceptions of themselves as gifted. However, teachers’ self-perceptions as gifted are unrelated to their attitudes toward gifted education. Finally, special education teachers hold slightly lower attitudes toward the gifted. The authors discuss the implications of these results for the field of gifted education. Putting the Research to Use: Those who provide training in gifted education need to reexamine the effectiveness of their training. We found that training in gifted education was not related to teachers’ attitudes toward the gifted, although it was positively related to teachers’ perceptions of themselves as gifted. It may be that training increases teachers’ understanding of giftedness and the needs of gifted students but fails to build support for meeting those needs. Because one of the primary objectives of training is to increase attendees’ attitudes toward gifted students, providers of gifted education training should consider assessing attendees before and after receiving training.
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