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18772859 - WEB WONDERS Assessment to Promote Learning...

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Unformatted text preview: WEB WONDERS Assessment to Promote Learning lthough your students‘ number 2 pencils may dull during the course of the school year from marking all the standard— ized tests they must take, these Web sites should sharpen your use of assess- ment as an instructional tool. Designing Assessments An assessment tutorial created by Australia’s Flinders University (WWW .flinders.edu.au/teach/assess/tutorialhtm) can help you tap into the potential of assessment. Although the informa— tion is aimed at a university audience, all educators can benefit from this site. The “How to Assess” section is particu- larly useful when designing assessment tasks. There are also sections on giving effective feedback, fairly aSSeSSing students with disabilities, and more. The spring 2003 issue of the American Educational Research Association's newsletter Research Points (www .aera.net/uploadedFiles/Journals_and_Publications fResearch_PointisP_SpringO3.pdD gives suggestions for aligning assessments to standards. Rubric Masonry Rubrics that provide criteria for evaluating student work can help teachers assess student learning in a more objective and ongoing way. The Landmark Project’s Rubric Builder (http:l/landmark—project.com/classweb/tools/rubric _builder.php3) provides a template for building your own rubric in any subject. You can also easily clone rubrics that others have posted on the site and make them available online for your students or colleagues. Eduscapes (http:/l eduscapes.com/tap/topic53.l1tm) is another good place to look for all things rubric-related. The site includes an overview of what rubrics are. links to articles on assessment approaches, and links to dozens of sources for rubric-building templates. Resources for English Language Learners As teachers try to tailor assessments to gauge the abilities of individual students, they often find it particularly difficult to measure the skills of students who do not speak a school’s dominant language. For help, visit the Web site of the English Language Learner Knowledge Base, an online resource for 96 EDUCATIONAL LEADERSHIP/NOVEMBER 2005 Getsmarlier.org unnects math and science to teenage studenis‘ everyday lives. those administering programs for English language learners (wwwhelp forschools.com/ELLKBase/index .shtml). The site is organized around seven elements of program develop— ment; “Element 4: Identify and Assess Students” is particularly useful. This area of the site guides users through a step-by—step procedure for identifying limited—English—proficient students and assessing their capabilities. including such steps as becoming familiar with relevant laws and administering a home language survey. Student, Assess Thyself Getsmarterorg makes self—assessment in math and science fun. Students can participate in quizzes and tutorials in math and science and then see how their results stack up against those of students in other countries who answered these questions as part of the Trends in International Mathematics and Science Study. The interactive MSTV portion of the site (www.getsmarter.org/mstv) is graphically appealing to teenagers and linked to meaningful uses of math and science. It puts high schoolers at the helm of self-assessment tuned to their own math and science skills improvement. Advocating for Alternatives The New York Performance Standards Consortium is made up of 28 small public high schools in New York State committed to providing alternatives to high-stakes standard- ized testing. Visit the consortium‘s site (wwwperformance assessment.org) to learn about these schools‘ self-styled assessment systems and to get pointers for advocating for alternatives to high-stakes tests in your own state or district. Digital Portfolios Digital portfolios are a popular means of authentic assess- ment. For examples of students' digital portfolios. visit the home page of Mt. Edgecumbe High School in Sitka. Alaska (www.mehs.educ.state.ak.us/portfolios/portfolio.html). Editor’s note: For a longer version listing additional resources, visit Web Wonders online at www.215cd.org/el. Laura Verlas is Assistant Editor, NBWslettars and Special Publications, ASCD; [email protected] Copyright of Educational Leadership is the property of Association for Supervision & Curriculum Development. The copyright in an individual article may be maintained by the author in certain cases. Content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder's express written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use. ...
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