esrm100s10 - Wind Turbines in Eastern Washington Chapter...

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Chapter 10: Energy Big Question: Can We Ensure a Reliable Supply of Energy? Wind Turbines in Eastern Washington
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Lesson 10 / ESRM 100 / University of Washington Types of Fuels: Conventional or Alternative Conventional fossil fuels include oil, gas and coal. Alternative fuels include wind, solar, water, wood, nuclear, and  geothermal. Conventional fuels are non-renewable; some alternative fuels are  renewable.
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Lesson 10 / ESRM 100 / University of Washington Petroleum Products: Oil  Oil is very abundant, but known supplies are dwindling. The oil  resource is the entire amount on Earth (total resource). An oil  reserve is the portion of the resource that we can extract now at a  profit (proven reserve).
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Lesson 10 / ESRM 100 / University of Washington When Will We Reach Peak Production? World crude oil production is expected to peak between 2020 and  2050 and cease by 2100.  Estimated total reserve is 3 trillion barrels of oil. Two other sources of oil are oil shale and tar sands.
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Lesson 10 / ESRM 100 / University of Washington Petroleum Products: Natural Gas The worldwide known recoverable natural gas will last  approximately 70 years at the present rate of use. However, it has only recently been widely exploited, and more  reserves are expected to be discovered.
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Lesson 10 / ESRM 100 / University of Washington Coal Coal-fired power plant in Centralia, Washington produces about 10% of Washington State’s energy.
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Lesson 10 / ESRM 100 / University of Washington How Coal Is Formed Coal formation began as dead vegetation was buried in sediments. Then it was crushed, heated, and transformed over millions of years into carbon rich 
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esrm100s10 - Wind Turbines in Eastern Washington Chapter...

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