esrm100s07 - Chapter 7: Forests and Wildlife Big Question...

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Chapter 7: Forests and Wildlife Big Question Can We Have Them and Use Them Too?
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Lesson 7 / ESRM 100 / University of Washington Forestry: Keeping Our Living Resources Alive For both forests and commercially valuable wildlife, the  traditional goal has been the maximum sustainable yield. This goal is based on traditional concepts: belief in the balance of  nature.
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Lesson 7 / ESRM 100 / University of Washington Modern Conflicts over Forestland and Forest Resources •What’s “natural” and what isn’t? •Growing trees has become a profession called silviculture. •Civilizations have literally been built on wood. •Forests also have had religious, spiritual, and aesthetic  importance.
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Lesson 7 / ESRM 100 / University of Washington Clearcutting
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Lesson 7 / ESRM 100 / University of Washington Muir and Pinchot At the heart of the conflict are the two different kinds of values,  utilitarian and nonutilitarian. John Muir (with Theodore  Roosevelt at his left, in the left-hand photo) and Gifford Pinchot  (right) personify the two viewpoints.
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Lesson 7 / ESRM 100 / University of Washington Hetch Hetchy The dam at Hetch Hetchy led to one of the greatest arguments  between Muir and Pinchot.
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Lesson 7 / ESRM 100 / University of Washington Controversial Questions •Should a forest be used only as a resource to provide materials  for people and civilization? •Should a forest be used only to conserve natural ecosystems and 
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This note was uploaded on 10/07/2009 for the course ESRM 13470 taught by Professor Rob during the Spring '09 term at University of Washington.

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esrm100s07 - Chapter 7: Forests and Wildlife Big Question...

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