introduction - Tutorial: SFU Library Plagiarism Tutorial...

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Tutorial: SFU Library Plagiarism Tutorial Section: Introduction to Plagiarism Page: Understanding and Avoiding Plagiarism Updated: 2007.04.11 Understanding and Avoiding Plagiarism: A Self-Directed Tutorial All writers use words and ideas borrowed from other sources. Journalists use facts and data they discover in their research. A novelist might use a plot idea she or he read in another book. Poets regularly borrow words, images, and metaphors. Academic writing is no different. Whether the author is a chemist writing about a new discovery in the lab, a sociologist describing a new theory, or an English lit professor writing about Shakespeare, academic writers usually make heavy use of previous writing on the same topic. However, one important difference between academic writing and other genres of writing is the importance of indicating the sources where words and ideas were borrowed from. No one expects a poet to footnote a poem to indicate where she or he found the words and metaphors. In fact, part of the
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This note was uploaded on 10/07/2009 for the course ENSC 6245 taught by Professor Stephenwhitmore during the Fall '08 term at Simon Fraser.

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introduction - Tutorial: SFU Library Plagiarism Tutorial...

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