mc5steps - Practice Exam 2 0 247 PRACTICE EXAM 2 ADVANCED...

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Unformatted text preview: Practice Exam 2 0 247 PRACTICE EXAM 2 ADVANCED PLACEMENT ENGLISH LANGUAGE Section I Total Time—1 hour Carefully read the following passages and answer the questions that follow. Questions 1410 are based on the following passage from Annie Dillard, What an Essay Com Do. In some ways the essay can deal in both events and ideas better than the short 1 story can, because the eSsayist—unlike the poet—"may introduce the plain, unadorned thought ,without the contrived entrances of long—winded characters who mouth discourses This sort of awful evidence killed “the novel of idea-” (But eschewing it served to limit fiction’s materials a little further, and likely contributed to our being left with the short story of scant idea.) The essayist may reason; he may treat of historical, cultural, or natural events, as well as personal events, for their interest and'meaning alone, without resort to fabricated dramatic occasions So the essay’s materials are larger than the story’s. - The essay may deal in metaphor better than the poem can, in some ways, 2 because prose may expand what the lyric poem must compress. Instead of confining a metaphor to half a line, the essayist can devote to it a narrative, descriptive, or reflective couple of pages, and bring forth vividly its meanings. Prose welcomes all sorts of figurative language, of course, as well as alliteration, and even rhyme. The range of rhythms in prose is larger and grander than that of poetry And it can handle discursive idea, and plain fact, as well as character and story. The essay can do everything a poem can do, and everything a short story can '3 do—everything but fake it. The elements in any nonfiction should be true not only artistically—the connections must hold at base and must be veracious, for that is the convention and the covenant between the nonfiction writer and his reader. Veracity isn’t much of a drawback to the writer; there’s a lot of truth out there to work with. And veracity isn’t much of a drawback to the reader. The real world arguably exerts a greater fascination on people than any fictional one; many people at least spend their whole lives there, apparently by choice. The essayist does what we do with our lives; the essayist thinks about actual things. He can make sense of them analytically or artistically. In either case he renders the real world coherent and meaningful; even if only bits of it, and even if that coherence and meaning reside only inside small texts. 4AHMat-cm'm'nmgyrflI»fi€;€{;§r‘1""lfi£§ffi” i-mv-anram' -‘5"~We"-:r-: t '1. Which technique does the author ‘ 2 . Based on a careful reading of the first ' employ to focus the reader’s attention paragraph, the reader can conclude on the specific topic of the passage? that the author blames the death of the A. use of parallel structure ‘ novel Of ideas on B. identifying herself with her audience A. real life and situations C. beginning each paragraph with the B. simplicity same subject C. appeal to philosophy D, use of passive voice D. reliance on historical data E. use of anecdote E. artificiality 248 . Developing Confidence with Using Skills .3. The primary rhetorical strategy the B. a critic author uses to develop the first par'a— C. an advocate graph is D. an innovator ‘ E. an artist A. process B' narration - 8.. An example of parallel structure is C" descr'lp tron . found in which of the following lines E" Sleeliifitéiblhl effect taken from the passage? A. “But eschewing it served to limit 4.. Near the end of the third paragraph, -~ fiction’s materials a little further, Dillard states, “The essayist does what fl and likely contributed to our being we do with our lives; the essayist thinks left with the short story of scant about actual things. He can make sense idea.” of them analytically or artistically. ” The B. “The essay may deal in metaphor most probable reason for the author better than the poem can, in some— choosing to write two separate sen— way because prose may expand tences rather than constructing a single, what the lyric poem must com— longer sentence using a listing, is press.” C. “The elements in any nonfiction should be true not only artistically . . . the connections must hold at base . . .” D. “.. .. . that is the convention and the covenant between the nonfiction writer and his reader .” E. “In either case he renders the S. In paragraph .3, in the sentence begin— 1331 world coherent and meaning- ning with “The real world .. . ..,” the ful; even if only bit of it, and even word “There” refers to if that coherence and meaning reside only inside small texts.” A. to reinforce cause and effect B. both subjects are of equal impor- tance, although separate processes C. to create a parallel situation D. to contrast the two ideas E- to highlight the criticism of fictional writing A- the fictional world I g novels 9. The contrast between the short story D” 30;”? l ‘ld” writer and the essayist is based on " t e rea WOI - which of the following? E .. short stories ‘ _ A. reflection 6.. The primary rhetorical strategy the B. presentation author uses to develop .the second C. fundamental reality paragraph 15 D. content A. contrast and comparison E. clarity 0f P11113056 B. narration _. C. argument 10. The tone of the passage can best be D. description described as . E. analogy A. impartial and critical condescending and formal . candid and colloquial .. clinical and moralistic confident and informative 7. In terms of her position on her subject, B. . C. the author can best be categorized as D E. A. an adversary Practice Exam 2 ° 249 Questions 11—21 are based on the following passage in which Henry Iames responds to a literary critic's ideas about the state of the English novel. There is one point at which the moral sense and the artistic sense lie very near together; that is in the light of the very obvious truth that the deepest quality of a work of art will always be the quality of the mind of the producer. In proportion as that intelligence is fine will the novel, the picture, the statue partake of the substance of beauty and truth. To be constituted of such elements is, to my vision, to have pur- pose enough. No good novel will ever proceed from a superficial mind; that seems to me an axiom which fOr the artist in fiction, will cover all needful moral ground: if the youthful aspirant take it to heart it will illuminate for him many of the mysteries of “purpose.” There are many other useful things that might be said to him, but I have come to the end of my article, and can only touch them as I pass. The critic in the Pall Mall Gazette, whom I have already quoted, draws attention to the danger, in speak— ing of the art of fiction, of generalizing. The danger that he has in mind is rather, I imagine, that of particularizing. I should remind the ingenuous student first of the magnificence of the form that is open to him, which offers to sight so few restrictions and such innumerable opportunities. The other arts, in comparison, appear confined and hampered; the various conditions under which they are exercised are so rigid and definite. But the only condition that I can think of attaching to the composition of the novel is, as I have already said, that it be sincere. This freedom is a splendid privilege, and the first lesson of the young novelist is to learn to be worthy of it. “Enjoy it as it deserves,” I should say to him; “take possession of it, explore it to its utmost extent, publish it, rejoice in it. All life belongs to you, and do not listen either to those who would shut you up into corners of it and tell yOu that it is only here and there that art inhabits, or to those who would persuade you that this heavenly messenger wings her way outside of life altogether, breathing superfine air, and turning away her head from the truth of things. There is no impression of life, no manner of seeing it and feeling it, to which the plan of the novelist may not offer a place; you have only to remember that talents so dissimilar as those of Alexander Dumas and Iane Austen, Charles Dickens and Gustave Plaubert have worked in this field with equal glory. Do not think too much about optimism and pessimism; try and catch the color of life itself. If you must indulge in conclusions, let them have the taste of a wide knowl- edge. Remember that your first duty is to be as complete as possible—to make as perfect a work. Be generous and delicate and pursue the prize. (1884} ....,.__......._._..Hrw_... _...r......r .__, 11. Iames draws a distinction between the B. indifferent , purpose of the novel and C. superficial i l D. reverent A. the moral theme , _ B. the artistic sense E" Chmt C. the mind of the producer D. obvious truth E. the substance of beauty ‘13. According to James, beauty and truth are directly related to _ _ _ A. the novel ‘12. From the opening of the passage, it rs B. inteliigence l i i i i clear that the author’s attitude toward C. a picture J the creation of a work of art is D a statue i A. democratic E . vision 250 - Developing Confidence with Using Skills 14., 15. 16.. 17. 18.. According to the fourth sentence, the word “axiom” can best be defined as A. a mystery B. an anecdote C. a paradox D. a rule of thumb E a proverb In the fifth sentence, “There are many other useful things that might be said to ‘ him, but I have come to the end of my article, and can only touch them as I pass,” the pronoun “him” refers to A. “youthful aspirant” B. “The critic” C. “The producer” D. “the artist in fiction” E. the author In the seventh sentence, “The danger that he has in mind is rather, I imagine, that of particularizing,” the word “rather” is used to establish A. a paradox an analogy . an ambiguity . a syllogism an antithesis F1730?“ According to Henry James, the freest form of art is . sculpting painting . speaking . writing photography @505”? In the middle of the passage, the sentence “ ‘Enjoy it as it deserves,’ I should say to him; “take possession of it, explore it to its utmost extent, 19. 20. 21. 333' includes an publish it, rejoice in it, example of A. a complex sentence B. parallel structure C. an analogy D. inversion E. passive voice In the second half of the passage, if the student follows the logic and advice of James in the set of sentences beginning with “This freedom is. a splendid . .. .” and ending with “the truth of things,” that student Would have to A. imitate the great writers B. pray for inspiration C. recognize that only after death can a writer be assessed properly D. ignore Iames’s advice E. turn away from writing Also in the middle of the passage is a sentence beginning with “All of life belongs . . ..” and ending with “the truth of things.” The metaphor, “this heavenly messenger,” contained in this sentence refers to A. freedom B. the teacher C. sincerity D. art E. the critic The over—all tone of the passage can best be described as A. informal and sarcastic B. condescending and sardonic C. didactic and exhortative D. reverential and ilaudatory T1. indignant and contemptuous Questions 22~35 are based on the following passage from Herman Melville’s “Nantucket.” Nantucket! Take out your map and look at it. See what a real corner of the 1 world it occupies; how it stands there, away off shore, more lonely than the Eddystone lighthouse. Look at it—a mere hillock, and elbow of sand; all beach, without a background. There is more sand there than you would use in twenty years Practice Exam 2 0 251 as a substitute for blotting paper. Some gamesorne wights" will tell you that they have to plant weeds there, they don’t grow naturally; they import Canada thistles; they have to send beyond seas for a spile’r to stop a leak in an oil cask; that pieces of wood in Nantucket are carried about like bits of the true cross in Rome; that people there plant toadstools before their houses, to get under the shade in sum— mer time; that one blade of grass makes an oasis, three blades a day’s walk in a prairie; that they wear quicksand shoes, something like laplander snowshoes; that ' . they are so shut up, belted about, every way inclosed, surrounded, and made an utter island of by the ocean, that to their very Chairs and tables small clams will sometimes be found adhering, as to the backs of sea turtles But these extravaganzas only show that Nantucket is no Illinois. Look now at the wondr ous traditional stOry of how this island was settled by 2 the red-rmen. Thus goes the legend. In olden times an eagle swooped down upon the New England coast, and carried off an infant indian in his talons. With lOud lament the parents saw their child borne out of sight over the wide waters. They resolved to follow in the same direction Setting out in their canoes, after a per— ilous passage they disc0vered the island, and there they found an empty ivory cas.ket,—the poor little Indian’s skeleton. What wonder, then, that these Nantucketers, born on a beach, should take to 3 the sea for a livelihood! They first caught crabs and quahogs in the sand; grown bolder, they waded out with nets for mackerel; more experienced, they pushed off in boats and captured cod; and at last, launching a navy of great ships on the sea, explored this watery world; put an incessant belt of circumnavigations round it; peeped in at Behring’s Straits; and in all seasons and ali oceans declared everlasting war with the mightiest animated mass that has survived the flood; most monstrous and most mountainousl That Himmalehan, salt-sea Mastodon, clothed with such portentousness of unconscious power, that his very panics are more to be dreaded than his most fearless and malicious assaults! And thus have these naked Nantucketers, these sea hermits, issuing from their 4 antihill in the sea, overrun and conquered the watery world like so many Alexander's; parceling out among them the Atlantic, Pacific, and Indian oceans, as the three pirate powers did Poland. Let America add Mexico to Texas, and pile Cuba upon Canada; let the English overswarrn all India, and hang out their blazing banner from the sun; two thirds of this terraqueous globe are the Nantucketer’s. For the sea is his; he owns it, as Emperors own empires; other seamen having but a right of way through it. Merchant ships are but extension bridges; armed ones but floating forts; even pirates and privateers, though following the sea as high— waymen the road, they but plunder other ships, other fragments of the land like themselves, without seeking to draw their living from the bottomless deep itself. The Nantucketer, he alone resides and riots on the sea; he alone, in Bible lan- guage, goes down to it in ships; to and frotpioughing it as his own special planta— tion. There is his home; there lies his business, which a Noah’s flood would not interrupt, though it overwhelmed all the millions in China. He lives on the sea, as prairie dogs in the prairie; he hides among the waves, he climbs them as mountain goats climb the Alps For years he knows not the land; so that when he comes to it at last, it smells like another world, more strangeiy than the moon WOuld to an Earthsman. With the landless gull, that as sunset folds her wings and is rocked to sleep between billows; so at nightfall, the Nantucketer, out of sight of land, furls his sail, and lays him to his rest, while under his very pillow rush herds of wal— ruses and whales. ‘" wights: human beings l spile: a small plug 252 0 Developing Confidence with Using Skills 22. 23., 24.. 2.5. 26.. The controlling analogy of the passage is A. Nantucketlllinois B, seazland C. Noah:Nantucket D. mooanarthsman E. legends:reality Melville describes Nantucketers as all of the following except: . conquerors natives of the sea farmers of the sea . strangers to the land exploiters of the Native American claims WUCWP The tone of the passage can best be described as A. self—congratulatory and confident B. formal and pompous ' C. admiring and hyperbolic D. informal and cynical E. pedantic and objective The most probable reason for repeat— ing and italicizing “There” in the mid— dle of paragraph 4 at the beginning of two main clauses in the same sentence is to A. force the reader to look for an antecedent sound poetic . provide a break ina long, compli~ cated sentence . emphasize the sense of place indicate sympathy for the plight of the Nantucketer F’U CW The shift in the focus of the piece occurs in which line? A. The first sentence of paragraph 2 B. The first sentence of paragraph 3 C. The first sentence of paragraph 4 D. The third sentence in paragraph 4 E, The last sentence 27.. 28 29.. m 31. econ? The first paragraph contains an extended example of parallel structure anecdote . periodic sentence . generalization argument F1005”? Melville retells the Native American legend of how the island was settled in order to A. have his audience identify with the Native American population. B. make the passage seem like a parable contrast with the reality of the Nantucketers . bring a mythic quality to the subject highlight the plight of the Nantucketers WOO The development of paragraph .3 is structured around spatial description selection of incremental details central analogy . parallel structure paradOX FUD??? Based on a careful reading of the pas— sage, complete the follOwing analogy: NANTUCKE lzlLLINOIS :: merchant shipszpirate ships Native American:eagle ivory casketzskeleton . backs of sea turtleszchairs and tables walr'ns:prairie dog One may conclude from the informa— tion contained in paragraph 3 that “himmalehan salt—sea mastedon” refers to A. the ocean B. the whale C. the power of nature ..r......._....m.t,,...w.__. .. .___.__._ ._ w. ____wwu_w”—__—F._mw..wm~e Nmmmm m‘wmmmewmwmm,‘ “quay...- Practice Exam 2 0 253 D. Biblical vengeance II. to balance the first part of the pas- E. emperors sage with the second part III. to reinforce the formality of his 32.. The purpose of the passage is most presentation probably to A. I ‘ A. encourage people to settle on B- H Nantucket C. III B. use Nantucket as a model of ecolog— D. I and H ical conservation ' E. I, H, and III C. honor the indomitable spirit of the Nantucketers 34. The subtle humor of the first paragraph D. plead for the return of Nantucket to is dependent upon the Native Americans . A. paradox E. present a nostalgic reminiscence of B. hyperbole the writer’s birthplace C. juxtaposition D. irony 3.3.. Melville uses thus twice in this passage: E. ad hominem argument once in the second sentence of para— graph 2 to begin the Native American 35. The last sentence of the passage contin- legend about the island being settled. ues the analogy between What is the reason for using thus a A ‘ 1' -'ll . second time in the first sentence of . ' rea 1ty.1 usron paragraph 4) B. mght:day ' C. mamanimal I. to begin a comparative legend with D. gullzwalrus E. seazland Questions 36—44 are based on the following passage from _ Lucy Stone, “A Disappointed Woman,” a speech she gave to the national women’s rights convention in Cincinnati, Ohio, in October, 18.5 5.. The last speaker alluded to this movement as being that of a few disap— 1 pointed women. From the first years to which my memory stretches, I have been a disappointed woman. When, with my brothers, I reached forth after the sources of knowledge, I was reproved with “It isn’t fit for you; it doesn’t belong to women.” Then there was but one college in the world where women were admitted, and that was in Brazil. I would have found my way there, but by the time I was prepared to go, one was opened in the state of Ohiohthe first in the United States where women and Negroes could enjoy opportunities with white men. I was disappointed when I came to seek a profession worthy an immortal being—every employment was closed to me, except those of a teacher, the seam— stress, and the housekeeper. In education, in marriage, in religion, in everything, disappointment is the lot of woman. It shall be the business of my life to deepen this disa...
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