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Unformatted text preview: i ENGIISI—I LANGUAGE AND COMPOSITION SECI ION I '[irne—-1 hour Directions: This part consists of selections-fr om prose works and questions on their content, form, and style, After reading each passage, choose the best answer to each question and completely fill in the corresponding oval on the answer sheet Note: Pay particular attention to the requirement of questions that contain the words NOT, IEASI, or EXCEPT Questions 1—10, Read the following passage carefully to have augmented our philosophical diction; and, in before you choose your answers, defence of his uncommon words and expressions, we must consider, that he had uncommon sentiments, and _ His exuber ance of knowledge, and plenitude of 45 was not content to express, in many words, that idea ideas, sometimes obstruct the tendency Of his reasoning for which any language could supply a single term. and the clearness of his decisions: on whatever subject But his innovations are sometimes pleasing, and Line he employed his mind, there started up immediately so his ternerities happy: he has many "verba ardentia" 5 many images before him, that he lost one by grasping forcible expressions, which he would never have found, another His memory supplied him with so many 50 but by venturing to the utmost verge of propriety; and illustrations, parallel or dependent notioIIS, that he flights which would never have been reached, but by was always starting into collateral considerations; one who had very little £831 of the shame of falling but the spirit and vigour of his pursuit always gives (1,756) 10 delight; and the reader follows him, without reluctance, through his mazes, in themselves flowery and pleasing, and ending at the point originally in view, "I'o have great excellencies and great faults, ’mngnw 1 Ihe reader can infer from the fir st paragraph that some critics have ' virtutes nec minors vitia,’ is the poesy,” says our author, (A) chastised Browne fm his inability to reason I 5 “0f file bESt natures” This P085? ma? be properly (B) lauded Browne’s frequent linear explanations apphed to the style of Browne; it is Vigorous, but (C) complained about Browners lack of dality rugged; it is learned, but pedantick; it is deep, but (D) compared Browne with Shakespeare obscure; it strikes, but does not please; it commands, (E) compared the author of the passage with but does not allure; his tropes are harsh, and his Browne 20 combinations uncouth, He fell into an age in which our language began to lose the stability which it had obtained in the time 2- 111 Context, "13065)?" (line 14) most neatly means of Elizabeth; and was considered by every writer as (A) poet—[y a subject on which he might try his plastick skill, by (B) inspir ago“ for WIitmg 25 moulding it according to his own fancy. Milton, in (C) sentimental thoughts consequence of this encroaching license, began to (D) flowery writing introduce the Latin idiom: and Browne, though he (E) poetic dreaming gave less disturbance to our structures in phraseology, yet poured in a multitude of exotick words; many, 3 Th . f h m , . 30 indeed, useful and significant, which, if rejected, must ' _ Sergeang 0 t e P 356 magma mums “BC mmom be supplied by circumlocution, such as commensality, mm (Imes 13—14) for the state of many living at the same table; but many (A) can be ascertained only if one understands superfluous, as a par alogical, for an unreasonable Latin doubt; and some so obscure, that they conceal his " (B) becomes clear at the end of the paragraph 35 meaning rather than explain it, as arthr itical analogies, (C) is obvious for par ts that serve some animals in the place of joints (D) has been lost over the centuries His style is, indeed, a tissue of many languages; (E) was known only to Browne a mixture of heterogeneous words, brought together from distant regions, with terms originally 40 appropriated to one art, and drawn by violence into the service of another. He must, however, be confessed GO ON To THE NEXT pAGE THE PRINCETON REVIEW AP ENGLISH [ANOUAGE AND COMPOSITION PRACTICE TEST 2 fi 203 7M anew.“ E'=1~."'1.'I; 4 in the second paragraph, the author 9 According to the author, Browne’s style is marked (A) is openly critical of Browne’s style by (B) hints that Browne’s writing is pedantic (A) heter‘oclite diction (C) justifies the strength of Br‘owrre’s style (B) homogeneous words (D) argues in favor of a reexamination of Browne’s (C) mundane vocabulary style ' (D) humorous phrases (E) suggests that Browne’s writing is too facile (E) heterogeneous tr0pes 5 The author modifies the strict parallelism of "it is 10. Which of the following best summarizes the pas- vigor'ous, but rugged; it is learned, but pedantick; it - sage? is deep, but obscure; it strikes, but does not please; it commands, but does not allure; his tropes are harsh, and his combinations uncouth” (lines 16—20) to (A) an impartial reconsideration of Browne’s style (B) a scathing critique by a riVaI ‘l (C) a manifesto by one of Browne’s colleagues (A) better define his point of view (D) a comparative study of Milton and Browne (B) keep the reader off balance (E) a virulent polemic (C) maintain a sense of imbalance (D) show more resPect for Browne’s accomplishments (E) to obfuscate his real opinions '11. Ihe author ’5 tone in this passage is best described as (A) sarcastic and doctrinaire (B) analytical and scholarly (C) expository and harsh (D) indulgent and condescending (A) linguistic experimentation (E) capricious and sentimental (B) literary conservatism (C) linguistic stability (D) metaphorical license (E) impoverishment of the English language 6. According to the author, Browne lived at a time of significant 7 In lines 27—36 ("Browne, though he gave less distur- bance .in the place of joints”), the author classifies ;‘ Browne’s diction in a manner that proceeds from i (A) interesting, to captivating, to intriguing i (B) appropriate, to inappropriate, to superfluous I (C) interesting, to intriguing, to disappointing (1 (D) useful, to unhelpful, to deleterious % (E) appropriate, to inappropriate, to intriguing f A 1' 8, Ihe author posits that Browne’s unusual diction can be tied to his desire (A) to mystify his readers (B) to develop English phraseology (C) to enrich the English language (D) to set himself apart from other authors of his time (E) to express exactly his unusual thoughts GO ON TO THE NEXT PAGE Questions 12—20.. Read the following passage carefully before you choose your answers. But is it upon the heroines that we would cast a final glance. “I have always been finding out my religion since I was a little girl,” says Dorothea Casaubon. "I Line used tO-pi ay 50 much—now lhar’dly ever pray. I try 5 not to have desires merely for myself. ” She is speaking for thern all. Ihat is their problem They cannot live without religion, and they start out on the search for one when they are little girls. Each has the deep feminine passion for goodness, which makes the place 10 where she stands in aspiration and agony the heart of the book—still and cloistered like a place of worship, but that she no longer knows to whom to pray. ln learning they seek their goal; in the ordinary tasks of womanhobd; in the wider service of their kind. lhey 15 do not find what they seek, arid we cannot wonder Ihe ancient consciousness of woman, charged with suffering and sensibility, and for so many ages dumb, seems in them to have brimmed and overflowed and uttered a demand for something-they scarcely know 20 what—for something that is perhaps incompatible with the facts of human existence George Eliot had far too strong an intelligence to tamper with those facts, and too broad a humour to mitigate the truth because it was a stern one Save for the supreme courage of 25 their endeavour, the struggle ends, for her heroines, in tragedy, or in a compromise that is even more _ melancholy But their story is the incomplete version of the story that is George Eliot herself. For her, too, the burden and the complexity of womanhood were 30 not enough; she must reach beyond the sanctuary and pluck for herself the strange bright fruits of art and knowledge. Clasping them as few women have ever clasped them, she would not renounce her own inheritance—the difference of view, the difference 35 of standard—nor accept an inappropriate reward. Ihus we behold her, a memorable figure, inordinately praised and shrinking from her fame, despondent, reserved, shuddering back into the arms of love as if there alone were satisfaction and, it might be, 40 justification, at the same time reaching out with “a fastidious yet hungry ambition" for all that life could offer the free and inquiring mind and confronting her feminine aspirations with the real world of men. Triumphant was the issue for her, whatever it may have 4 5 been for her creations, and as we recollect all that She dared and achieved, how with every obstacle against here—sex and health and convention—she sought more knowledge and more freedom till the body, weighted with its double burden, sank worn out, we must lay 50 upon her grave whatever we have it in our power to bestow of laurel and rose. (1919) THE PRlNEETDN REVIEW AP ENGLlSH LANGUAGE AND COMPOSITION PRAETICE TEST 2 h? 205 12. The speaker in the passage above can be described best as (A) a family member of George Eliot (B) a member of the clergy (C) a student (D) a chauvinist literary critic (E) a professional writer 13. According to the speaker, George Eliot’s heroines are “cloistered” (line 11) because they are (A) in a church (B) essentially alone (C) in a monastery (D) imprisoned in Cloisters (E) lost in prayer 14 In context, "the facts of human existence” (line 21) (A) restrict both men and women (B) restrict women only (C) are only applicable to Eliot’s heroines (D) pertain to any literary character (E) pertain to men only 15. "Save for” (line 24) most nearly means (A) except for (B) saving (C) safe for (D) guarding against (E) keeping in mind 16. Ihe “differences” mentioned in line 34 pertain to Eliot’s (A) profession (B) class (C) upbringing (D) education ' (E) gender 17. According to the speaker, Eiiot (A) enjoyed excellent health (E) suffered from her independence and knowledge (C) was prevented from attaining fame by men (D) was very unlike the heroines of her books (E) repudiated her feminine nature GO ON TO THE NEXT PAGE 18 In the sentence beginning "Ihus we behold her ” (lines 36—43 ), the speaker employs all of the follow- ing EXCEPT (A) apposition (B) hyperbole (C) personification (D) relative clauses (E) parallelism 19 It is reasonable to assume that the phrase “a fastidi— ous yet hungry ambition" (lines 40—41) (A) is spoken by one of Eliot’s heroines t (B) comes from one of the speaker ’s literary works (C) is borrowed from one of Eliot’s critics (D) is not to be taken seriously (B) does not represent the speaker 's point of View 20 Generally, the style of the entire passage is best defined as (A) effusive and disorganized (B) pedantic and terse (C) sympathetic and concrete (D) abstract and metaphysical (E) intellectual and cynical -~ Human GO ON TO THE NEXT PAGE 206 CRACKING THE AP ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND COMPOSITION EXAM Questions 2165.. Read the following passage carefully before you Choose your answers. It will be readily admitted, that a population trained in regular habits of temperance, industry, and sobriety; of genuine charity for the opinions of all [me mankind, founded on the only knowledge that can .5 implant tIue charity in the breast of any human being; trained also in a sincere desire to do good to the utmost of their power, and without any exception, to every one of their fellow creatures, cannot, even by their example alone, do otherwise than materially increase ,‘0 the welfare and advantages of the neighbourhood in which such a population may be situated To feel the due Weight of this consideration, only imagine to yourselves 2,000 or 3,000 human beings trained in habits of iicentiousness, and allowed to remain in 15 gross ignorance How much, in such a case, would not the peace, quiet, comfort, and happiness of the neighbourhood be destroyed! But there is not anything Ihave done, or purpose to dofwhich is not intended to benefit my fellow-creatures to the greatest extent 20 that my operations can embrace. I wish to benefit all equally; but circumstances limit my present measures for the public good within a narrow circle. I must begin to act at some point; and a combination of singular events has fixed that point at this establishment The 25 fir st and greatest advantages will therefore centre here But, in unison with the principle thus stated, it has ever been my intention that as this institution, when completed, will accommodate more than the children of parents resident at the village, any persons living 30 at i anar k, or in the neighbourhood anywhere around, who cannot well afford to educate their children, shall be at liberty, on mentioning their wishes, to send them to this place, where they will experience the same care and attention as those who belong to the establishment 35 Nor will there be any distinction made between the children of those parents who are deemed the worst, and of those who may be esteemed the best, members of society: rather, indeed, would I prefer to receive the offspring of the worst, if they shall be sent at an early 40 age; because they really require more of our care and pity; and by well training these, society will be more essentially benefited, than if the like attention were paid to those whose parents are educating them in comparatively good habits. The system now preparing, 43 and which will. ultimately be brought into full practice, L is to effect a complete change in all our sentiments and conduct towards those poor miserable creatures whom the errors of past times have denominated the bad, the worthless, and the wicked A more enlarged and 50 better knowledge of human nature will make it evident that, in strict justice, those who apply these terms to their fellow-men are not only the most ignorant, but are themselves the immediate causes of more misery THE PRINCETON REVIEW AP ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND COMPOSITION PRACTICE TEST 2 in the world than those whom they call the outcasts 55 of society They are, therefore, correctly speaking, the most wicked and worthless; and were they not grossly deceived, and rendered blind from infancy, they would become conscious of the lamentably extensive evils, which, by their well-intended but most mistaken 60 conduct, they have, during so long a period, inflicted on their fellow-men But the veil of darkness must be removed from their eyes; their erroneous proceedings must be made so palpable that they shall thenceforth reject them with horror Yes! They will reject with 65 horror even those notions which hither to they have from infancy been taught to value beyond price. ' (1816) 21. In general, the passage reveals a point of view that is (A) philanthropic and utopian (B) pessimistic and cynical (C) altruistic and elitist (D) quixotic and irrational (E) positivist and unreasonable 22 Ihe Institution (line 27) is (A) ahospital (B) atown (C) an asylum (D) a school (B) achurch 23 The sentence that begins "Ihey are, therefore, con rectly speaking, the most wicked and wor thless. . ” (lines 55—61) serves to (A) explain a paradox (B) prepare an antithesis (C) present an analogy (D) resolve an inconsistency (E) summarize a theme 24. "Ihey" (line 64) refers to (A) (B) (C) (D) (E) the poor the wealthy the inhabitants of lanark the inhabitants of neighboring areas all of the above GO ON TO THE NEXT PAGE 25. The speakea appears most interested in (A) establishing mercantile and financial establishments (B) creating more employment and cultutal opportunities (C) abolishing socioeconomic and cultural differences (D) discussing social conduct and poverty (E) impazting knowledge and moral values GO ON TO THE NEXT PAGE 208 CRACKING THE AP ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND COMPOSITION EXAM Questions 26—32.. Read the following passage carefully before you choose your answer's. And yet, being a problem is a strange experience: Peculiar even for one who has never been anything else, Save perhaps in babyhood and in Europe. it [me is in the early days of rollicking boyhood that the 5 revelation first bursts upon one, all in a day, as it were Iremember well when the shadow swept across me I was a little thing, away up in the hills of New England, where the dark Housatonic winds between Hoosac and I'aghkanic to the sea. in a wee wooden schoolhouse, 10 something put it into the boys’ and girls’ heads to buy gorgeous visiting-cards—ten cents a package—and exchange. The exchange was merry, till one girl, a tall newcomer, refused my card—refused it peremptorily, with a glance Then it dawned upon me with a certain 15 suddenness that lwas different from the others; or like, mayhap, in heart and life and longing, but shut out from their world by a vast veil I had thereafter no desire to tear down that veil, to creep through; I held all beyond it in common contempt, and lived above it 20 in a region of blue sky and great wandering shadows. That sky was bluest whenl could beat my mates at examination—time, or beat them at a foot-r ace, or even beat their stringy heads Alas, with the years all this fine contempt began to fade; for the worlds 1 longed 25 for, and all their dazzling opportunities, were theirs, not mine But they should not keep these prizes, I said; some, all, I would wrest from them. )ust how [would do it I could never decide: by reading law, by healing the sick, by telling the wonderful tales that swam in my 30 head‘some way With other black boys the strife was not so fiercely sunny: their youth shrunk into tasteless sycophancy, or into silent hatred of the pale world about them and mocking distrust of everything white; or wasted itself in a bitter cry, Why did God make me 3 5 an outcast and a stranger in mine own house? The shades of the prison—house closed round about us all: walls strait and stubborn to the whitest, but relentlessly narrow, tall, and unscalable to sons of night who must plod darkly on in resignation, or beat unavailing palms 40 against the stone, or steadily, half hopelessly, watch the streak of blue above From Il-TE SOULS OF BLACK FOLK, WE B Du Bois (1903) ‘g 26 The speaker was a problem because (A) of his ambition (B) he was involved in schoolyard fights (C) he was contemptuous of his peers (D) of his race (E) of his upbringing THE PRINCETON RE‘llEW AP ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND COMPGSlTI 27 In this passage, the anecdote of the visiting—cards serves as (A) an epiphany for the speaker (B) a moment of triumph for the speaker (C) a revelation for the reader (D) a turning point for the school (E) a chance for redemption for the speaker 28 After presenting the incident of the visiting—cards, the speaker controls the rest of the passage by em~ ploying (A) repeated appeals to authority (B) a series of euphernisms (C) a series of analogies (D) two extended metaphors (E) self-deprecating humor 29. The “sons of the night” (line 38) are (A) evil young men (B) African American boys (C) sons of evil parents (D) lost souls (E) prisoners 30. One can infer from the passage all of the following EXCEPT that (A) the speaker considered himself superior to his white peers (B) the speaker considered himself superior to his African American peers (C) the other African American boys treated their white peers with deference (D) the speaker was superior to his white peers in many ways (E) the speaker felt isolated from both white and African American peers 31. The speaker ’s contempt wanes and is replaced by (A) a commitment to become a famous professional (B) a pledge to beat his peers in athletic contests (C) a helpless rage against society (D) a spirit of revenge (E) actions that eventually lead him to prison 32 The tone of this passage can NOT be described as (A) self-aware (B) decisive (C) fervent (D) reflective (E) laudator y (30 ON TO THE NEXT PAGE 0N PRACTICE "(EST 2 at 209 Questions 33—39, Read the following passage carefully before you choose your answers. Now, I hold that Illinois had a right to abolish and prohibit slavery as she did, and I hold that Kentucky has the same right to continue and protect slavery [me that Illinois had to abolish it. I hold that New York 5 had as much right to abolish slavery as Virginia has to continue it, and that each and every State of this Union is a sovereign power, with the right to do as it pleases upon this question of slavery, and upon all its domestic institutions Slavery is not the only 10 question which comes up in this controversy. There is a far more important one to you, and that is, what shall be done with the free negro? We have settled the slavery question as far as we are concerned; we have prohibited it in Illinois forever, and in doing so, I think 1 5 we have done wisely, and there is no man in the State who would be more strenuous in his opposition to the introduction of slavery than I would; but when we settled it for our selves, we exhausted all our power over that subject We have done our whole duty, and 20 can do no more. We must leave each and every other State to decide for itself the same question, In relation to the policy to be pursued toward the free negroes, we have said that they shall not vote; whilst Maine, on the other hand, has said that they shall vote Maine is 2 5 a sovereign State, and has the power to regulate the qualifications of voters within her limits I would never consent to confer the right of voting and of citizenship upon a negro, but still I am not going to quarrel with Maine for differing from me in opinion, Let Maine take 30 care of her own negr'oes, and fix the qualifications of her own voters to suit herself, without interfering with Illinois, and Illinois will not interfere with Maine, So with the State of New York She allows the negro to vote provided he owns two hundred and fifty dollars’ 3 5 worth of property, but not otherwise While I would not make any distinction whatever between a negro who held property and one who did not, yet if the sovereign State of New York chooses to make that distinction it is her business and not mine, and I will 40 not quarrel with her for it She can do as she pleases on this question if she minds her own business, and we will do the same thing Now, my friends, if we will only act conscientiously and rigidly upon this great principle of popular sovereignty, which guarantees to 45 each State and Territory the right to do as it pleases on all things, local and domestic, instead of Congress interfering, we will continue at peace one with another Why should Illinois be at war with Missouri, or Kentucky with Ohio, or Virginia, with New York, 50 merely because their institutions differ? Our father's intended that our institutions should differ. Ihey knew that the North and the South, having different climates, productions, and interests, required different institutions This doctrine of Mr. Lincoln, of uniformity 55 among the institutions of the different States, is a new doctrine, never dreamed of by Washington, Madison, or the framers of this government. Mr iincoln and the Republican party set themselves up as wiser than these men who made this government, which has 60 flourished for seventy years under the principle of popular sovereignty, recognizing the right of each State to do as it pleased, Under that principle, we have grown fr‘dm a nation of three or four millions to a nation of about thirty millions of people; we have 6 5 .crossed the Allegheny mountains and filled up the w ole Northwest, turning the prairie into a garden, and building up churches and schools, thus spreading civilization and Christianity where before there was nothing but savage barbarism Under that principle we 70 have become, from a feeble nation, the most powerful on the face of the earth, and if we only adhere to that principle, we can go forward increasing in territory, in power, in strength, and in glory until the Republic of America shall be the north star that shall guide the 75 friend of freedom throughout the civilized world And why can we not adhere to the great principle of self-government upon which our institutions were originally based? lbelieve that this new doctrine preached by Mr. Lincoln and his party will dissolve 80 the Union if it succeeds Ihey are trying to array all the Northern States in one body against the South, to excite a sectional war between the free States and the slave States, in order that the one or the other may be driven to the wall Stephen Douglas (1858) 33 In this passage the Speaker ’5 purpose is to (A) analyze the causes of slavery (B) argue in favor of states’ rights (C) criticize individual states (D) describe the advantages of a federal government (E) argue in favor of slavery 34 Which of the following best describes the tone of the passage? (A) mOck enthusiasm (B) righteous indignation (C) well-reasoned polemic (D) objective rationalization (E) ironic detachment GO ONTO THE NEXT PAGE CRACKING THE A? ENGLISH lANGUAGE AND COMPOSITION EXAM 35 In the first two sentences (lines 1—9), the speaker grounds his central idea on which of the following rhetorical strategies? (A) inductive reasoning (B) deductive reasoning (C) description (D) classification (E) appeal to ignorance 36. Ihe most significant rhetorical shift in the passage begins with (A) “So with the State of New York ” (lines 32—33) (B) “Now, my friends. ” (line 42) (C) “Why should Illinois be at war with Missouri .” (line 48) (D) "Under that principle. ..” (line 69) (E) “I believe that this new doctrine . ” (line 78) 37. The speaker substantiates his central idea with (A) clever anecdotes (B) innovative symbols (C) unusual paradoxes (D) extended metaphors (E) appeal to authority 38. From the passage, it appears that the speaker ’5 per— sonal view is that African Americans should be (A) slaves and should not be allowed to hold property (B) should not be slaves and should be allowed to vote (C) should not be free but should be allowed to hold some property (D) should be free but not allowed to vote (E) should be allowed to hold property and to vote 39. In the final lines of the passage, the Speaker at- tempts to Win over his audience by (A) inspiring confidence (B) shifting blame (C) instilling fear (D) reconciling differences (E) over'stating a problem i GO ON TO THE NEXT PAGE : THE PRINCETON REVlEW AP ENGLISH lANGUAGE AND COMPGSlTIOlI PRACTICE TEST 2 fig 211 10 I5 20 25 50 5'5 40 45 Questions 40—46,. Read the following passage carefully before you choose your answers. Observe, the merchant’s function (or manufacturer ’5, for in the broad sense in which it is here used the word must be understood to include both) is to provide for the nation It is no more his function to get profit for himself out of that provision than it is a clergyman’s function to get his stipend This stipend is a due and necessary adjunct, but not the object of his life, if he be a true clergyman, any more than his fee (or honorarium) is the object of life to a true physician Neither is his fee the object of life to a true merchant. All three, if true men, have a work to be done irrespective of feeM-to be done even at any cost, or for quite the contrary of fee; the pastor ’5 function being to teach, the physician’s to heal, and the merchant’s, as l have said, to provide that is to say, he has to understand to their very root the qualities of the thing he deals in, and the means of obtaining or producing it; and he has to apply all his sagacity and energy to the producing or obtaining it in perfect state, and distributing it at the cheapest possible price where it is most needed ' And because the production or obtaining of any commodity involves necessarily the agency of many lives and hands, the merchant becomes in the course of his business the master and governor of large masses of men in a more direct, though less confessed way, than a military officer or pastor; so that on him falls, in great par t, the responsibility for the kind of life they lead: and it becomes his duty, not only to be always considering how to produce what he sells, in the purest and cheapest forms, but how to make the various employments involved in the production, or transference of it, most beneficial to the men employed And as into these two functions, requiring for their right exercise the highest intelligence, as well as patience, kindness, and tact, the merchant is bound to put all his energy, so for their just discharge he is bound, as soldier or physician is bound, to give up, if need be, his life, in such way as it may be demanded of him Iwo main points he has in his providing function to maintain: first, his engagements (faithfulness to engagements being the real root of all possibilities, in commerce); and, secondly, the perfectness and purity of the thing provided; so that, rather than fail in any engagement, or consent to any deterioration, adulteration, or unjust and exorbitant price of that which he provides, he is bound to meet fearlessly any form of distress, poverty, or labour, which may, through maintenance of these points, come upon him (1860) 40 The author relies principally on which rhetorical strategy? (A) appeal to authority (B) classification (C) description (D) induction (E) analogy 41, According to the author, a merchant is (A) not motivated primarily by the prospect of making a profit (B) more devoted to material gain than a clergyman (C) less focused on making money than is a physician (D) essentially different from a manufacturer (E) wholly dedicated to material gain 42, in line 7, "adjunct" most nearly means (A) accompaniment (B) evil (C) adjustment (D) bonus (E) addition 43‘ “Agency” (line 23 ) is directly related semantically to A) business (line 25) B) merchant (line 24) C) master (line 25) D) commodity (line 23) ( ( ( ( ( ) duty (line 29) m 44. The author uses “hands” (line 24) (A) as a synecdoche (B) to reinforce the manual aspect of most labor of his time (C) to attenuate the repetition of the word “men” (D) as a concrete image (E) all of the above GO ON TO THE NEXT PAGE 212 E CRACKING THE AP ENGllSH lANGUAOE AND COMPOSITION EXAM 45‘ Ihe "two functions" in line 34 are 46 Most likely, the author would (A) earning high profits and pacifying the workers (A) support Marxism (B) manufacturing a good, cheap product and (B) neither like nor dislike socialism providing for workers ' (C) support capitalism (C) exploiting the workers and maximizing profits (D) support anticlerical groups (D) manufacturing good products and making (E) dislike the medical profession good profits (E) dealing with unions and keeping profits high GO ONTO THE NEXT PAGE THE PRINCEION REVIEW AP ENGlJSH LANGUAGE AND COMPOSITEDN PRACTlCE TEST 2 213 Questions 4760 Read the following passage carefully 50 In this passage, the speaker is most notably im- before you choose your answers pressed by Ihis archipelago consists of ten principal islands, of E3) :11: :13: :1; :3: lisgggisocean which five exceed the others in size. Ihey are situated (C) th ha m ms of Ianite under the Equator, and between five and six hundred (D) the g :tlical (:0: aters, on the islands Line miles westward of the coast of America They are all e Symm . (E) the topography of the smaller islands 1 l l l 5 formed of volcanic rocks; a few fragments of granite J curiously glazed and altered by the heat, can hardly be considered as an exception, Some of the craters, surmounting the larger islands, are of immense size, and they rise to a height of between three and four I 0 thousand feet. Their flanks are studded by innumerable '” smaller orifices lscarcely hesitate to affirm, that there l! - must be in the whole archipelago at least two thousand ‘ ‘ craters, Ihese consist either of lava or scoriae, or of I finely—stratified, sandstone-like tuff Most of the latter 15 are beautifully symmetrical; they owe their origin to eruptions of volcanic mud without any lava: it Q is a remarkable circumstance that every one of the twenty—eight tuff-craters which were examined had their southern sides either much lower than the other 20 sides, or quite broken down and removed As all these - craters apparently have been formed when standing in the sea, and as the waves from the trade wind and the swell from the open Pacific here unite their forces on the southern coasts of all the islands, this singular 25 uniformity in the broken state of the craters, composed of the soft and yielding tuff, is easily explained (1839) (A) meticulous classification (B) unusual point of View (C) precise description (D) resourceful analogies i i 47. This passage is most notable for its _ i J (E) lyrical prose ; 48. Most likely, the passage is extracted from _ é (A) an entry in a scientific journal (B) a nineteenth-century novel (C) a book on tourism (D) a letter from a poet (E) a book on volcanoes 1 49. in context, one can infer that tuff is (A) an alternate spelling for tough (B) a kind of sand (C) made up principally of grass (D) volcanic rock (E) dense and resistant GO ON TO THE NEXT PAGE 214 CRACKING THE A? ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND COMNSITIUN EXAM I Questions 51—54. Read the following passage carefully before you choose your answers, Art begins with abstract decoration, with purely imaginative and pleasurable work dealing with what is unreal and nonexistent This is the first stage Then 3 Life becomes fascinated with this new wonder, and 5 asks to be admitted into the charmed circle Art takes life as part of her rough material, re—cr'eates it, and refashions it in fresh forms, is absolutely indifferent to fact, invents, imagines, (dreams, and keeps between herself and reality the impenetrable barrier of beautiful 10 style, of decorative or ideal treatment. The third stage is when life gets the upper hand, and drives Art out into the wilderness That is the true decadence, and it is from this that we are now suffering Take the case of the English dr ama At first in 15 the hands of the monks Dramatic Art was abstract, decorative and mythological Then she enlisted Life in her service, and using some of life's external forms, she created an entirely new race of beings, whose sorrciws were more terrible than any sorrow man has 20 ever felt, whose joys were keener than lover ’s joys, who had the rage of the Titans and the calm of the gods, who had monstrous and marvelous sins, monstrous and marvelous virtues To them she gave a language different from that of actual use, a language full of 25 resonant music and sweet rhythm, made stately by solemn cadence, or made delicate by fanciful rhyme, jeweled with wonderful words, and enriched with lofty diction She clothed her children in strange raiment and gave them masks, and at her bidding the antique 3’0 world rose from its marble tomb A new Caesar stalked through the streets of risen Rome, and with purple sail and flute—led oars another Cleopatra passed up the river to Antioch, Old myth and legend and dream took shape and substance. History was entirely rewritten, 35 and there was hardly one of the dramatists who did not recognize that the object of Art is not simple truth but complex beauty In this they were perfectly right Art itself is really a form of exaggeration; and selection, which is the very spirit of art, is nothing more than an 40 intensified mode of over-emphasis 7 But Life soon shattered the perfection of the form. Even in Shakespeare we can see the beginning of the end It shows itself by the gradual breaking-up of the blank-ver se in the later plays, by the predominancet 45 given to prose, and by the overimportance assigned to“ characterization. The passages in Shakespeare—and they are many—where the language is uncouth, vulgar, exaggerated, fantastic, obscene even, are entirely due to Life calling for an echo of her own voice, and rejecting 50 the intervention of beautiful style, through which alone " Iiri should iife be suffered to find expression Shakespeare is not by any means a flawless artist He is too fond of going directly to life, and borrowing life’s natur ai utterance He forgets that when Art surrenders her 55 imaginative medium she surrenders everything (1889) 51 The author of this passage is most likely (A) apoet (B) anovelist (C) an art critic (D) a journalist (E) an actor 52 The author relies principally on which of the follow— ing to substantiate his thesis? (A) a faulty analogy (B) process analysis (C) deductive reasoning (D) an accumulation of facts (E) illustration by example 53 ”, .when Art surrenders her imaginative medium she surrenders everything” (lines 55—56) is in the form of (A) amaxim (B) achiasmus (C) an antithesis (D) an understatement (E) ananalogy 54. Above all else, the author reveres (A) beauty (B) life (C) Shakespeare (D) Caesar (B) English drama END OF SECTION I THE PRlNCETON REVIEW AP ENGiISH LANGUAGE AND COMPOSITION PRACTICE TEST 2 l% 215 ...
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