7 - 7.1 Basics about Waves Introduction An acoustic wave is...

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110 7.1 Basics about Waves Introduction An acoustic wave is a small amplitude pressure disturbance in a compressible fluid . Other types of pressure disturbances: ultrasonic and infrasonic waves (inaudible frequencies) high-intensity waves (jet engines, missiles) shock waves (explosions, supersonic aircraft) Acoustic waves are longitudinal (or plane) waves. Acoustic energy is transferred from one fluid particle to the next by a series of local compressions and rarefactions. Note: The propagation of a wave is distinct from the motion of its component fluid particles. To illustrate, imagine a piece of cork in the ocean as a wave passes by: The cork moves up and down as the wave passes, but its position in x is unchanged. Waves propagate energy, but not matter. Ocean waves are transverse waves rather than longitudinal waves. A longitudinal wave is more like a spring with a local compression that moves horizontally when released.
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This note was uploaded on 10/12/2009 for the course AME 341AL at USC.

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7 - 7.1 Basics about Waves Introduction An acoustic wave is...

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