lec1 - ECE 333: Introduction to Communication Networks Fall...

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1 ECE 333: Introduction to Communication Networks Fall 2002 Lecture 1: Introduction Examples of communication networks/uses Course Goals History Classification of networks Related courses 2 Notes: This is an introductory course on communication networks. This course is still being developed in places; I hope you will forgive any "rough edges" that are still present in the course. Also I hope you will provide me with feedback during the quarter on what you like/dislike about the course and how it can be improved. Administrative details about the course are contained in the course information sheet handed out during lecture and available at http://www.ece.nwu.edu/~rberry/ECE333/infosheet01.pdf Please read over this sheet carefully before next lecture. The first couple of lectures will be very descriptive and at a high level; after these lectures, the course will become more technical and go into greater depth.
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3 Questions: What is a communication network? Examples/Uses? 4 A communication network is a system that allows users to exhange information. Users? Information? (analog vs. digital)
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5 Notes: A "user" can be a variety of things including a person, a computer program or a wireless sensor. Examples of "information" include data files, speech and video. We are primarily interested in networks where the information is represented digitally, i.e., as a sequence of binary digits (bits). Of course, some information signals, such as speech are inherently analog, however this information can still be represented as a digital sequence through sampling and quantization. Details of analog-to-digital conversion will not be dealt with in this class, but is covered in detail in other classes such as signals and systems (ECE 222), digital signal processing (ECE 359), etc. Some common examples of communication networks include cable TV networks, the public telephone network and computer networks such as a local area network in an office or the Internet - which is actually a "network of networks." Early communication networks were designed for a single purpose, e.g. telephone networks, cable TV networks, and computer networks. The trend in modern networks is towards networks that can satisfy a variety of different uses - these are sometimes called integrated service networks . A key reason for this trend is economic considerations - it is thought to be more cost effective to build and maintain a single multi-purpose network, than several single-purpose networks. Another fundamental reason behind this trend is the above fact that all information can be represented as
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lec1 - ECE 333: Introduction to Communication Networks Fall...

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