Psychology Chapter Five-2

Psychology Chapter Five-2 - Psychology Chapter Five...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–4. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Psychology Chapter Five Sensation and Perception pg 158 - Light waves= brightness and colour - Air vibrations= sounds - Chemical substances= odours or tastes - Not the case or people with Synesthesia - Synesthesia= “mixing of the senses.” - These people provide glimpses into different aspects of how we “sense” and “understand” our world - Experiences are referred to as perception - Sensations: is the stimulus-detection process by which our sense organs respond to and translate environmental stimuli into nerve impulses that are sent to the brain - Perception: marking “senses” of what our senses tell us – is the active process of organizing this stimulus input and giving it meaning - Same sensory inputs can be perceived in different ways at different times - Can be influences by the contexts surrounding them - Perception takes a step beyond sensation Sensory Process - Five classical senses: Vision, audition (hearing), touch, gestation (taste), and olfaction (smell). - Psychophysics: studies relations between the physical characteristics of stimuli and sensory capabilities, is concerned with two kinds of sensitivity. - 1. Concerns the absolute limits of sensitivity - 2. Differences between stimuli
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Stimulus Detection: The Absolute Threshold - Lowest intensity at which stimulus can be detected correctly 50 percent of the time. Thus the lower the absolute threshold the greater the sensitivity Signal Detection Theory - Decision criterion, a standard of how certain they must be that a stimulus is present before they will say they detect it. - This theory is concerned with the factors that influence sensory judgements The Difference Threshold - Is defined as the smallest difference between two stimuli that people can perceive 50 percent of the time - Is sometimes called the just noticeable difference (jnd) - Weber’s law- states that the difference threshold is directly proportional to the magnitude of the stimulus with which the comparison is being made, and can be expressed as a Weber fraction. Sensory Adaptation - Sensory neurons are engineered to respond to a constant stimulus by decreasing their activity, and the diminishing sensitivity to an unchanging stimulus is called sensory adaptation - Adaptation, habituation, is a part of everyday experience - Occurs in all sensory modalities, including vision - Frees our senses from the constant and the mundane to pick up information changes in the environment - These changes may turn out to be important to our well-being or survival The Sensory Systems Vision
Background image of page 2
- The normal stimulus for vision is electromagnetic energy, or light waves, which are measured in nanometres - ROY G. BIV, red, orange, yellow, green, blue, indigo, violet - The Human Eye - Light waves enter the eye through the cornea, a transparent protective structure at the front of the eye - Behind the cornea is the pupil, an adjustable opening that can dilate or constrict to control the amount of light that enters the eye - The size of the pupil is controlled by muscles in the colour iris that surrounds the
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 4
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 10/12/2009 for the course MIT 2000 taught by Professor Da during the Spring '09 term at Acadia.

Page1 / 14

Psychology Chapter Five-2 - Psychology Chapter Five...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 4. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online