handout_Thevenin

handout_Thevenin - THVENINS THEOREM Often, we are...

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THÉVENIN’S THEOREM Often, we are interested in what is happening at a particular place in a circuit, and don’t need all of the details about the rest of the circuit. Thévenin’s Theorem says that we can replace the rest of the circuit by a very simple Equivalent Circuit as long as the circuit contains only resistances and sources. (Actually, it works for inductors and capacitors, too, but don’t worry about that now.) Say we have a circuit composed of R’s and sources, and want to determine a simpler circuit which exhibits the same behavior at some pair of nodes in the circuit: This is called a one-port network. The reason we are interested in a port consisting of two nodes is that we would like to know how the circuit will behave if we attach something to the nodes (such as a resistance.) For example, you might think of your stereo system as the circuit, with the wires to one of the speakers as the port of two nodes. Then, the speaker is the thing we would connect to the nodes.
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handout_Thevenin - THVENINS THEOREM Often, we are...

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