Fossil Report - Lauren Hill Neanderthal Tabun C1 At the...

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Lauren Hill Neanderthal Tabun C1 At the cave site of Tabun in Mount Carmel, Israel, the most compete hominin skeletal remains are that of a female Neanderthal specimen, named Tabun C1 (Schwarcz et al. 1998). Throughout the 1930’s, this cave site was excavated by D.A.E. Garrod and D.M.A. Bate (Schwarcz et al. 1998). The Tabun woman is recognized as a Neanderthal form with some characteristics more similar to Homo sapiens and has proved difficult to date. The most remarkable feature of the Tabun C1 fossil is that it is nearly complete. The cranial features of this fossil are among the most commonly discussed characteristics of this specimen, since they are primarily used for taxonomic designations of fossils. Garrod originally described the fossil as being fully adult, because the third molar is well worn, small and delicate (Garrod 1932). It has no chin, and in fact a receding jaw typical of Neanderthals (Garrod 1932). Other Neanderthal characteristics observed include a low skull, arched
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This note was uploaded on 10/13/2009 for the course YIPH ln;ljhdfi taught by Professor Wanger during the Spring '09 term at Heriot-Watt.

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Fossil Report - Lauren Hill Neanderthal Tabun C1 At the...

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