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Equilibrium - Cut to the Chase Equilibrium Problems When...

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Cut to the Chase Equilibrium Problems When teaching equilibrium problems, consider teaching it as if there are only two types of problems. Some problems have X in them and you solve for X. Some problems will have no X in them. In both cases you start the problem with a RICE CHART. How do you tell if a problem will have an X in the rice chart or not? (a) If either reactant is a strong acid or base, there will be no X in the chart. In other words, the reaction will go to completion. ( Limiting Reactant Problem). (b) If all of the reactants are weak, the rice chart will have an X in it. THE MOST IMPORTANT THING TO STRESS IS WHEN WRITING THE BALANCED EUQATION USE (→ ) WHEN A REACTANT IS A STRONG ACID OR BASE. (→) MEANS THERE IS NO X IN THE CHART. WHEN ALL OF THE RACTANTS ARE WEAK, USE ( <- ). THE DOUBLE ARROW MEANS IT IS AN EQUILIBRIUM PROBLEM AND AN X WILL BE IN THE RICE CHART. By using this approach, all of acid base chemistry problems can be looked at as two basic problems. Try the practice problem below. Notes and Example Problems Chemical Equilibrium
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Equilibrium - Cut to the Chase Equilibrium Problems When...

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