sample_quiz_1 - Quiz #1 Spring 2005 __l_1 slide #2 M ’LO...

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Unformatted text preview: Quiz #1 Spring 2005 __l_1 slide #2 M ’LO slide #3 MM Architect i _C_JY__ slide #4 W W slide #5 w p: ' slide #6 M W V m _5_ slide #7 W- ‘ .11. #1: JA slide #3 W P W P i" PART II. OBJECTIVE (30 points) Marl: the best selection in the space provided to the left of the number. . i: 1. In his chapter on “Daylight in Architecture” Rasmussen discussed the Chapel at Ronchamps by Le Corbusier (which we also looked at in class). Which of the following best describes his observations? a. Le Corbusier works here with daylight-flooded rooms well suited to precise forms and pure colors. b. There is not one plane surface in the church: the entire building curves and swells into an extraordinarily well-integrated composition that has the rhythm of the landscape. 0. The design of the entire building is based on the same rigorous analysis and clearheaded logic consistent which had characterized Le Corbusier work hitherto. d. On entering the church the first thing that strikes you is that it is so vast, with plane surfaces and regularity dominating the character of the interior. A 2. In his chapter on “Rhythm in Architecture" Rasmussen discusses the work of Palladio (who we also discussed in class) using S. Giorgio Maggiore church in Venice as an illustration. Which of the following best describes Rasmussen’s observations about Palladio’s work there? a. He tends toward regular shapes and ideal forms: semi-circulararches, domed vaults, the square, the octagon and the circle. The building’s rhythm progresses at a dignified pace from one perfect form to _u - n - . rlUH‘ b. His goal is to create tension and mystery. No single in and of itself. It is only in rhythmic relation to each other that they obtain meaning. 0. He builds on a framework of pageantry and ceremony. Even when the buildings are empty the architecture alone produces the effect of stirring and solemn procession. There is a compulsion to move. (1. Palladio uses asymmetry effectively to create dynamic, rhythmic environments. This is not the plodding rhythm of earlier eras but a bright new syncopated rhythm. -, 0.; Tu . . 3. In his chapter on “.Ar ' tectur Experienced as Colored Planes” Rasmussen illustrates the 4W House by Mies van der' Rohe (who we have also discussed in class . Which of the following best describes his observations in this part of the book? a. Mies employs a traditional conception of solids and voids in the building. Its heavy stone masses are contrasted with clean expansive voids on each building face. b. The Tugendhat House is an artistic sketch in color with each side of its rectangular plaster forms painted a different color to eliminate its substance. c. Mies’ works are carefully worked out to the last detail and composed of the finest materials: plate glass, stainless steel, polished marble, costly textiles, fine leather. It is a world of screens with no distinct separatiOn between interior and exterior. d. Like early Renaissance buildings, the Tugendhat House has closed rooms where peace and quiet can- be found. The atmosphere-is warm and------ fuzzy. C/ 4. In his chapter on f‘Contrasting Effects Of Solids and Cavities” Rasmussen discusses the Porta Pia in Rome by Michelangelo (an architect whose work we also discussed in class). Which of the following best describes Rasmussen’s observations about the Porta Pia? a. It represents a striving for balance and harmony. It is a perfect example of rigorously correct architecture. b. The architect is clearly interested in construction for construction sake and cavity for cavity sake. It relies heavily on the viewer’s familiarity with and appreciation for architectural rules. c. The work is deliberately restless, an effort to create drama. The most bizarre details are crowded together in fantastic combinations. d. As an early work, this is far less capable than Michelangelo’s later projects. It is accidental and serendipitous in many cases unlike his later, more deliberate work. Ps5. In his chapter on “Solids and Cavities” Rasmussen discusses St. Peter's in Rome (also discussed in class)——e5pecially the original plan by Bramante. Which of the following is a point he makes in that discussion? a. b. c. d. Its great cavities are like a regular cave temple dug out of an enormous building block. During church festivals it becomes a vast sepulchral temple closing around St. Peter’s grave. It is a very clear assemblage of solid stone elements—cubes, spheres and pyramids that leave a complex residual Space between. The single unified space indicated by the plan is vast and unarticulated. It revels in the grand scale of an undifferentiated volume. As in Gothic cathedrals the architect here becomes so interested in forming all of the structural parts that he loses sight of the fact that construction is a means and not an end in itself. I 6. In the lecture on “Nature/Biologlerganisms“ as an inspiration of form we discussed several ways in which the Guggenheim Museum in Bilbao, Spain, eitpresses its functidm’site. 'Which of the following is not one of the points made in that discussion? b. c. d. The dragon-like form of the building” related to a powerful legend of the Basque region that described a society of dragons that once ruled the area. 1 The flowing forms of the building relate to its location on a winding river and even to the shapes of boats that navigate this coastal area. Forms of a fish (even with scales) or waves of the sea are appropriate to a maritime environment. The free—spirited, sculptural quality of the building makes it an appropriate home for art. ' i2 7. In the lecture on “Mathematicsteometry” we discussed Leonardo da Vinci’s drawing of a man at some length along with some other of his sketches. Which of the following is not a point made in that discussion? a. b. Leonardo found. a. basis for the. s physiognomy of the human body. The golden ratio is implicit in the dimensions of both limbs (shoulder to elbowfshoulder to fingertip, hip to kneefhip to heel) and torso (navel to footfhead to foot) of the human body. quare and the. circle in---the-- . Leonardo sketched a new kind of church with a centralized plan based strongly on the circle and square as sacred geometries. Leonardo designed a whole utopian city where the city as a whole and individual buildings were all strictly controlled by mathematicsigeometry. Z 8. In the lecture on “Order and Systems” we discussed the grid as an ordering device that has been very influential in the development of downtown Austin. Which of the following is not an observation about that grid noted in class? a. b. C. d. The downtown/UT campus area is a subdivision of the Jeffersonian grid laid out over much of the midsection of the United States and so is aligned with the cardinal points—true northlsouthz’eastfwest. The grid responds to the location of the Colorado River and a hill On which the Capitol Building was to be located. By its specific configuration the grid provided implications as to where commerce would be concentrated, where public buildings'would be located, where parksfcommunity activities might occur, etc. The grid is altered in comparison to the more common grid of Texas towns like Lockhart or La Grange in response to the local landscape and Austin’s role as the capital city. D 9. In the second lecture in the series on “Form” the Centre Pompideau in Paris was noted as expressing three new ideas about art. Which of the following is not one of those ideas? a. b. C. d. Art has become a part of a mass productionfconsumption society. The building expresses that. ' Art is dynamic/changingi’unpredictable. The building conveys a need for flexibility and accommodation over time. Art is of the moment. It is not about the past and may even be ephemeral. The building clarifies that role. Art is tied to its immediate culture and is not transferable. The building is all about its particular context and locale. In the first lecture in the series on “Form” we discussed six “beautiful” buildings in terms of both why the beauty was produced and how it was achieved. Which of the following is not one of those buildings matched with the motivation that provoked its beauty? a. b. C. Chartres Cathedral used beauty as a means to express religious fervor—in particular homage to the Virgin Mary. Vaux-le-Vicomte used beauty to express power, its builder’s superior accumulation of extraordinary wealth and artistic sephistication. San Carlo alla Quattro Fontane used beauty to express lovemthe commitment of its builder to his long-term mistress. d. The Chapel at Ronchamps used beauty to express spirituality—adeep, emotional feeling. ...
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This note was uploaded on 10/13/2009 for the course ARC 308 taught by Professor Speck during the Spring '08 term at University of Texas at Austin.

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sample_quiz_1 - Quiz #1 Spring 2005 __l_1 slide #2 M ’LO...

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