Chapter_03

Chapter_03 - chapter 3 Motivation What Is Motivation...

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3 Motivation chapter
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What Is Motivation? Motivation is the direction and intensity of effort. Direction of effort refers to whether an individual seeks out, approaches, or is attracted to situations. Intensity of effort refers to how much effort an individual puts forth in a situation. Direction and intensity of effort are closely related.
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Views of Motivation Participant- or trait-centered view Situation-centered view Interactional view
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Views of Motivation Participant- or trait-centered view Motivated behavior is primarily a function of individual characteristics (e.g., needs, goals, personality).
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Views of Motivation Situation-centered view Motivated behavior is primarily determined by the situation.
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Views of Motivation Interactional-centered view Motivated behavior results from the interaction of participant factors and situational factors.
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Interactional View of Motivation
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Five Guidelines for Building Motivation Guideline 1 Both situations and traits motivate people.
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Five Guidelines for Building Motivation Guideline 2 People have multiple motives for involvement. Understand why people participate in physical activity. People participate for more than one reason. People may have competing motives for involvement. People have both shared and unique motives. Motives change over time. Motives differ across cultures.
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How to Identify Participant Motives Observe participants. Talk informally to others. Ask participants directly.
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Major Motives for Sport Participants Improving skills Having fun Being with friends Experiencing thrills and excitement Achieving success Developing fitness
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Major Motives for Exercise Participants Joining Health factors Weight loss Fitness Self-challenge Feeling better Continuing Enjoyment Liking instructor Liking type of activity Social factors
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Five Guidelines for Building Motivation
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This note was uploaded on 10/14/2009 for the course EXSS 181 taught by Professor Hedgepeth during the Summer '09 term at UNC.

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Chapter_03 - chapter 3 Motivation What Is Motivation...

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