Chapter_17

Chapter_17 - chapter 17 Exercise and Psychological...

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17 Exercise and Psychological Well-Being chapter
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Session Outline Why Exercise for Psychological Well- Being? Exercise in the Reduction of Anxiety and Depression Exercise and Mood Changes How Exercise Enhances Psychological Well-Being (continued)
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Session Outline (continued) Exercise and Changes in Personality and Cognitive Functions and Sleep Exercise and Quality of Life Special Cases of Exercise and Psychological Well-Being Exercise As an Adjunct to Therapy
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Why Exercise for Psychological Well-Being? Stress and increased demands are part of our daily lives, and more Americans than ever are feeling their ill effects. Exercise positively influences feelings of well-being and decreases anxiety and depression.
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Why Exercise for Psychological Well-Being? Hectic pace of westernized, technological society. Across the lifetime, 25% of individuals will experience anxiety disorders and 20% depression. Anxiety disorders and depression cost the public $45 billion a year. By the year 2020 depression will be second only to cardiovascular disease as the leading cause of death and disability. Epidemiological data: Physical activity is positively associated with good mental health in the U.S. and Canadian populations.
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Exercise in the Reduction of Anxiety and Depression Mental health problems account for 30% of the total days of hospitalization in the U.S. and 10% of the total medical cost. Although a cause–effect relationship has not been established, regular exercise is associated with reductions in anxiety and depression. (continued)
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Exercise in the Reduction of Anxiety and Depression (continued) High-intensity aerobic activity is not absolutely necessary in producing positive effects. Other activities (e.g., strength training, yoga) also have produced positive effects.
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Anaerobic Versus Aerobic Exercise Anaerobic Short-term, or burst, activities not involving the transportation of oxygen (e.g., weightlifting, baseball) Aerobic Longer-term activities that increase pulmonary and cardiovascular system activity (e.g., cycling, running)
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Acute Versus Chronic Acute Short-term effects Chronic Long-term effects
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Reduction of Anxiety Acute effects of exercise Aerobic exercise is associated with lower state anxiety and higher tranquility scores. Postexercise reductions in state anxiety return to preexercise anxiety levels within 24 hours. (continued)
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(continued) Acute effects of exercise Exercise intensities between 30% and 70% of maximal heart rate appear to be associated with the greatest reduction in postexercise state anxiety. Moderate-intensity exercise produced the greatest positive effects in affective responses. (continued)
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This note was uploaded on 10/14/2009 for the course EXSS 181 taught by Professor Hedgepeth during the Summer '09 term at UNC.

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Chapter_17 - chapter 17 Exercise and Psychological...

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