Chapter_23

Chapter_23 - chapter 23 Aggression in Sport Session Outline...

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23 Aggression in Sport chapter
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Session Outline Aggression in Contemporary Sport What Is Aggression? Causes of Aggression Aggression in Sport: Special Considerations Implications for Practice
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Aggression in Contemporary Sport NBA Pistons–Pacers brawl NHL player Bertuzzi’s blindsided punch broke vertebra of competitor Steve Moore Local youth ice hockey coach conducted a drill where players practice fighting
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What Is Aggression? Aggression “Any form of behavior directed toward the goal of harming or injuring another living being who is motivated to avoid such treatment” (Baron & Richardson, 1994)
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Criteria for Aggression Aggression is a behavior. Aggression involves harm or injury (physical or psychological). Aggression is directed toward a living organism. Aggression involves intent.
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Types of Aggression Hostile or reactive aggression The primary goal is to inflict injury or psychological harm on another. Instrumental aggression This is aggression occurring in the quest of some nonaggressive goal.
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Distinction Between Instrumental and Reactive Aggression It is too simplistic to think of instrumental and reactive aggression as a simple dichotomy. The clear majority of instrumental aggressive acts occur in conjunction with some type of reactive process. Think of hostile and instrumental aggression as anchoring the opposite end of a continuum and recognize that at times aggression might involve elements of both types.
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Causes (Theories) of Aggression Instinct theory Frustration–aggression hypothesis Social learning theory Revised frustration–aggression theory General model of aggression
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Instinct theory Individuals have an instinct to be aggressive, which builds up until it must be expressed (directly or via catharsis). [no support]
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Chapter_23 - chapter 23 Aggression in Sport Session Outline...

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