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Using UNIX for 231 - EECS 231 A Simple Introduction to...

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EECS 231: A Simple Introduction to Using UNIX for Programming Assignments L. Henschen FORD 3.327 491-3338 [email protected] JANUARY, 2007
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Table of Contents INTRODUCTION .............................................................................................................. 3 SOFTWARE REQUIRED FOR REMOTE LOGIN ...................................................... 4 LOGGING IN AND THE MAN COMMAND ................................................................ 5 FILES AND DIRECTORIES ........................................................................................... 7 COMPILING AND RUNNING C++ PROGRAMS - INTRODUCTION .................. 10 EMACS: A SIMPLE LINE EDITOR FOR UNIX AND C++ ..................................... 12 MAKE AND MAKEFILES ............................................................................................ 14
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Introduction The purpose of this document is to provide students in this class with enough of an introduction to certain UNIX tools so that they can do their programming assignments. It is not meant to be a comprehensive or general introduction to UNIX features, nor is it intended to introduce operating systems concepts. The coverage of features for any individual UNIX tool is not deep but should be enough for students to use the tools effectively for this class. Students are referred to any of a large number of standard books on UNIX tools as well as the “man” command within UNIX itself for additional information on these and other tools. The material presented here has been compiled from a variety of standard books on UNIX as well as from previous teachers and Teaching Assistants for this course, particularly Prof. Peter Scheuermann, Mr. Olivier Ghica, and Mr. Hui Ding. Many sections of this document illustrate actual dialogues with the UNIX system or the student’s own PC or describe text that the student must enter into a field. To distinguish such information from the normal text in this document, the following color- coding scheme is used: Orange text is text the student types. Green text is text that the computer displays back to the student.
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Software Required for Remote Login Each student will be given an account for the department’s UNIX lab. This account allows both on-site and remote login to the lab and provides non-volatile storage on the lab’s file system. User files can be accessed from any machine in the lab or through remote login. For security reasons, remote login to the UNIX machines in the department lab must be made using a secure shell client (SSH) protocol. Requests for connection through a non-secure software tool, such as HyperTerminal, will not be accepted. If you are accessing the lab remotely, you will need to go through Northwestern’s virtual private network, for an added level of security. See http://www.it.northwestern.edu/offcampus/index.html for instructions how to add and then configure a connection to this private network An excellent, free software package allowing secure remote login can be obtained from http://www.chiark.greenend.org.uk/~sgtatham/putty/download.html Select the release version of putty.exe appropriate for your computer. (Note, this site also posts a so-called “development snapshot”, which is their latest working version and which is not guaranteed to work.) Use of the graphics debugger (GDD) remotely requires a computer which supports an X-Windows environment. If your computer does not support this, you can check the department lab web site for instructions on how to obtain the required software: http://www.ece.northwestern.edu/CFS/PCs.html
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