4a(2) - Name Chapter 4 A-Sensation and Perception Description Instructions Modify Add Question Here Question 1 Multiple Choice 0 points Modify

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Name Chapter 4 A--Sensation and Perception Description Instructions Modify Add Question Here Question 1 Multiple Choice 0 points Modify Remove Question Technically, your absolute threshold is the point which you can detect Answer a stimulus 50 percent of the time. a stimulus 75 percent of the time. any stimulus set point. any stimulus that registers on sensory memory. Add Question Here Question 2 Multiple Choice 0 points Modify Remove Question According to psychologists, the minimum stimulus intensity of any sensory input that an organism can detect is Answer its sensory memory. subject to sensory adaptation. the absolute threshold. the just noticeable difference (JND). Add Question Here Question 3 Multiple Choice 0 points Modify Remove Question Juanita was drinking some warm punch and she thought she could just detect a faint taste of nutmeg in the punch. However when she took another sip the taste wasn't there. On the third sip she could just make out the taste of nutmeg again. It is very likely that the amount of nutmeg in the punch was Answer just below her taste constancy level. producing inhibitory synapses rather than excitatory synapses. producing action potentials that were too weak to reach the terminal buttons. just at her absolute threshold for taste. Add Question Here Question 4 Multiple Choice 0 points Modify Remove Question Giovanni was watching the night sky on a clear evening in November. He noticed that sometimes when he looked directly overhead he could detect a very faint star. A few minutes later it seemed that the star had disappeared, and then it "appeared" again. In this case, it is very likely that the light from the star was Answer just below Giovanni's level for perceptual invariance. producing action potentials that were too weak to reach the terminal buttons. just at Giovanni's absolute threshold for light. producing inhibitory synapses rather than excitatory synapses. Add Question Here Question 5 Multiple Choice 0 points Modify Remove Question Ron is making potato soup. His roommate tastes it and tells Ron it is great, but Ron thinks it needs more salt. He adds just a little salt, and thinks the soup now tastes perfect. However, his roommate tastes it again and tells Ron that the soup is ruined because it is too salty. Apparently, for the taste of salt Answer Ron can detect a smaller just noticeable difference than his roommate. Ron's roommate can detect a smaller just noticeable difference than Ron can. Ron has a higher absolute threshold than his roommate does. Ron has a lower absolute threshold than his roommate does. Add Question Here Question 6 Multiple Choice 0 points Modify Remove Question Research into absolute thresholds has found that Answer there is a fixed point where the probability of detecting a stimulus jumps from 0% to 100%. absolute thresholds vary between 25% detection rates and 75% detection rates, depending on the individual.
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This note was uploaded on 10/15/2009 for the course PGS 11653 taught by Professor Kate during the Fall '09 term at ASU.

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4a(2) - Name Chapter 4 A-Sensation and Perception Description Instructions Modify Add Question Here Question 1 Multiple Choice 0 points Modify

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