HistoryChapter6 StudyGuide.docx - Chapter 6 Study Guide for HIST 1301 People Worth Remembering \u25cf John Dickinson \u2013 A wealthy Philadelphian he wrote

HistoryChapter6 StudyGuide.docx - Chapter 6 Study Guide for...

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Chapter 6 Study Guide for HIST 1301 People Worth Rememberin g: John Dickinson – A wealthy Philadelphian, he wrote the widely read Letters from a Farmer in Pennsylvania (1767-8) in protest of the Townshend Acts. He also wrote the Olive Branch Petition and headed the committee that created the Articles of Confederation but his initial proposal, which sought a strong federal government, was rejected. William Paterson – He proposed the New Jersey Plan at the Constitutional Convention, which called for relatively minor changes in the Articles of Convention government and resisted possible domination by large states under the Virginia Plan. James Madison – A Virginia political philosopher, he was the main author of the U.S. Constitution and Bill of Rights and was the fourth president of the United States. Alexander Hamilton – Born into poverty in the West Indies, he became the leading advocate for a strong national government as main author of The Federalist Papers. He was a confidante of George Washington, founder of the Federalist Party and the first secretary of the treasury. Daniel Shays – This Revolutionary War veteran led an armed insurrection among farmers in western Massachusetts in 1786 that gave momentum to calls for a stronger federal government. George Mason – This Virginian was a leader among those who pushed for a Bill of Rights to be added to the U.S. Constitution, which he refused to sign. John Jay – This Founding Father held various key offices, including president of the Continental Congress and first chief justice of the U.S. Supreme Court, negotiated several important treaties on behalf of the U.S., and authored several of The Federalist Papers.
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Adam Smith – This Scottish economist argued that competition and a free market would have served Britain better than its mercantilist colonial policies. He wrote the landmark The Wealth of Nations (1776).
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