BIO 111 - There once was a mycete among us, Who had mycelia...

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1 There once was a mycete among us, Who had mycelia very humongous. It rarely was seen For ‘neath our lawns green Lived this mysterious subterranean fungus Lecture 5 Fungi 15 September 2009 BIOL 111 – Organismal Biology Fungi lecture outline 1. Characteristics, symbioses, importance to ecosystem 2. Phylogeny 3. General life cycles 4. Diversity Fungi • absorptive heterotrophs • most are decomposers ( saprobes ) • cell wall of chitin • most are multicellular • most are terrestrial (moist) • produce spores unicellular yeast budding Most of a fungus is underground. • “ fruiting bodies ” (e.g., mushrooms) are formed for sexual reproduction “fairy ring” decomposing log What is a fairy ring? Most of a fungus is not apparent.
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2 Fruiting bodies produce spores by meiosis. spore – unicellular reproductive structure; asexual or sexual, haploid or diploid mushroom gills Characterize the spores produced & released by mushrooms (fruiting bodies). 1. asexual, haploid 2. asexual, diploid 3. sexual, haploid 4. sexual, diploid 5. multicellular as e xu a l, h ap lo . se l, d ip x ua l, haploi. sexual, diplo i.. multi c elular 34% 21% 5% 11% 28% Spores can also be produced asexually. Penicillium = conidia Spores are commonly dispersed “puffball” earth star fungi Most fungi have a filamentous body plan. • long branched filaments = hyphae • tangled mass of hyphae = mycelium • filamentous structure provides large surface area • 2 hyphal forms: septate – have cross-walls coenocytic – no cross-walls Where else did we see a coenocytic body plan? Most hyphae are not completely divided into separate cells. mycelium 2 nuclei = dikaryotic
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3 Highly evolved hyphae • hyphae adapted for predation • hyphae adapted for parasitism (+/-) of or mutualism (+/+) with plants mycorrhizae = mutualistic fungi that are associated with plant roots • ecto- , endo- types. • fungus receives carbohydrates
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This note was uploaded on 10/16/2009 for the course BIOL BIOL111 taught by Professor R during the Fall '09 term at McGill.

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BIO 111 - There once was a mycete among us, Who had mycelia...

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