Lecture 18 - Th The University of Texas at Dallas Erik...

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Erik Jonsson School of Engineering and h U i it f T t D ll Computer Science The University of Texas at Dallas Miscellaneous Topics; Final Programming Example In our final session on MIPS software, we will start with a discussion of several miscellaneous topics, and end with another example of program development. Topics: perating systems Operating systems Starting up or “booting” a computer How a computer operating system (OS) manages the execution f user programs in a multi sking environment of user programs in a multi-tasking environment Multiprogramming and virtual memory Processes; launching a process; process switching © N. B. Dodge 09/09 Lecture #18: Computer Operation, Processes, and Final Programming Example 1 Exceptions
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Erik Jonsson School of Engineering and h U i it f T t D ll Computer Science The University of Texas at Dallas Operating Systems An operating system (OS) is a program that performs computer system startup functions and controls ecution of programs execution of programs. The OS provides functions that are not available with the basic computer instruction set, such as supervisory functions and running application programs . Examples are Unix® , Linux® , and Windows® , which supervises PC programs such as Word®, Excel®, Power Point®, etc. An advantage of an OS is that users do not have to know details of computer hardware or how to do data © N. B. Dodge 09/09 Lecture #18: Computer Operation, Processes, and Final Programming Example 2 ow de s o co pu e dw e o ow o do d input or output – the OS handles these.
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Erik Jonsson School of Engineering and h U i it f T t D ll Computer Science The University of Texas at Dallas Operating Systems (2) Operating system characteristics: Controls all process operations (i.e., it is “the boss”) Runs in reserved memory that is protected against access by user programs ( For the MIPS R2000, memory addresses 0x80000000 ). Activates user programs and determines access to both the CPU-related hardware and to peripherals such as the printer, CRT, disk memory (“hard drive[s],” DVD-ROM), etc. Prioritizes access by user programs to basic software routines (such as device handlers like the print driver, etc.). Sets up and monitors communication with other processes, © N. B. Dodge 09/09 Lecture #18: Computer Operation, Processes, and Final Programming Example 3 network input/output, etc.
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Erik Jonsson School of Engineering and h U i it f T t D ll Computer Science The University of Texas at Dallas Operating Systems (3) Since the OS handles fundamental operations, users do not have to deal with these details . Example: printing a Word ® file under Windows ® -- When pp g the user “prints” a Word file, Word converts the document to a standard data format and passes it to Windows, which activates a “print driver” (software designed to communicate ith the specific printer used) to output data to the printer with the specific printer used) to output data to the printer.
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This note was uploaded on 10/16/2009 for the course EE 2310 taught by Professor Dodge during the Spring '09 term at University of Texas at Dallas, Richardson.

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Lecture 18 - Th The University of Texas at Dallas Erik...

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