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Practice Final - Answer Key

Practice Final - Answer Key - Name g g 5 l 1 Briefly...

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Unformatted text preview: Name g g 5 l 1. Briefly define (18 points): a) Stereotypical or instinctual behavior -. behavior "ma-F does: “0F involve \eqrhina bemuge 3-1: based on COWFV-zirmH-‘j 1b 0 Cari—Gin PO‘H’U“ b) Allopatric speciation '- sPccjafion {hol- om when «amigvng c regions and are separated $03 phgsiml so M emaci- cragg— breed CW3 Separcfit / amicgicm hem-i 00; c) Inducible promoter -. Sequence. a; bNA “CUM “mm 0% Q rtgud *‘r‘ert is a Chemicod m char words , ‘H‘ae, Prom-{ru— “flymm “‘2' 86‘1'3 “evasion Mr is have subject-+0 (tgu\o.‘\'l‘cn b3 mafia;- COMPOund) . \ cl) Bourgeois behavior '. organiems th'Hwk behouior +015 1‘: ad- like Q dove. cud-side. 09 its "frri‘l'unj and “he uhcwuk ingldg kmfi | e) Reciprocal altruism : 0 Greenhouse gas = gases such as major voPor, methane. (CH-d . and Carbon dioxide. (C09 4h0+ absaxbs {n‘R-ortd radio'h‘cn {3|wa +he nun and re~cmfis Pros hank Theo) ohm ud- in beep heck ‘fi'bm fismpina +he, och“ 6h M‘s Sur'Pocg Name 2. Match the taxonomic category on the left to an organism on the right (there is only one right answer for each organism, so one line on the left should be blank). (8 points) _5_ Phylum Arthropoda /1‘f E. coli _1_ Domain Eubacteria Z kangaroo L Phylum Echinodermata Km 1 Subkingdom Protozoa ,7.’ Paramecium *2; Class Mammalia % Cactus m Class Insecta X Spider "& Phylum Annelida ,é.’ Brittle star A Division Angiospermae )8.’ Earthworm _3_ Phylum Cnidaria 3. Match the term on the left with the one on the right that best describes it. (10 points) I Freshwater sticklebacks 5 Angiosperms ,2.’ Compound eyes J2 Tit-for—Tat ,8.’ Conductive tissue i Climax community fl! Migration into Asia A Arthropods and molluscs ,5./ Double fertilization i Homo erectus ,6.’ Average payoff V _2._ Land plants ,7.’ Average payoff 1/2 V _|_ Bony plate reduction KNitrosomonas _8_ Monotremes 1f Ecological succession 4L Hawk encounters dove )rtf Prisoner’s Dilemma 3 Bourgeois encounters bourgeois 11. Class Mammalia Name 4. You are a female worker ant in a colony of a species where the queen mates only once a) You have a chance to save two of your worker sisters, but only if you sacrifice your own life. Should you do it? Show your calculations. (5 points) c=s 5:7. r=3ls (15-- C >0 cosh/bond)“- c‘LQH-nalsh‘c helmtor UH) L23 — I >0 vest -% b) You have a chance to save two of your brothers, but again only if you sacrifice your own life. Should you do it? Show your calculations. (5 points) C5! 5:2 r=|/z rb—c>c> ('/7_5(2\ — 1 3 o a‘ The queen of your colony is heterozygous for a dominant mutant allele for selfishness, while the male that she mated with did not carry this allele. Workers who carry this allele will not share food with other workers, though they will cheerfully accept food from other workers. A = “was a\\¢\e (dom‘xcoxd—3 can: normal and: (mess‘wc) Queen : Ao Male 1 u c) What fraction of the workers in the colony will behave selfishly? What fraction of the males? (4 points) Froc’don o?- ?emoAc moxie): = 'lz \ F o g I / some. mlueo-(v‘ maternal (““0“ 0": m0\es ’2‘ CD‘M‘OU‘W btmge I]: 0‘! hone. she possess an A and other ‘A 5? fine. she passes a“ .9. (Guam ) ylA Vac: . l‘ * (12*: = -\-\~\\s doesn'+ hdp Var—this question (Mme) '0‘ EM) Name 4d) Give one reason why this selfishness allele is or is not likely to spread in the ant species that you belong to in the future. (5 points) This selfish o\\e\e. is E “wage: spread aware ant Species because Shasta one. 09 +he chncde markers with JWfiS selfish uueie Be (330“: 41-.» Pmduce 09%Pfincas, ethose mic-s uni“ qflg Shem: ‘/z 0? hair (Sleaze w'rth “mic- M‘ex-n Compared with fie (Deficient a? rated-ed neg Voluc UP 3/4 bEWe-em-ihis {Benoit W and towns (sides) Produced with: queen Uner mother) , +hc other MR. Wm w‘m have no problem end-ice +301; ’M‘C “,an eggs“ wk; Pram +he 903%“?th one. a? Macias Realms fine «a.» queen.‘ A\so. as long as the nm‘kwik. wankers Whitacabhfitj ‘l'odirW-excnfiode W1 skim who are, seM—‘rgh and sisters who share, 4“an rem +0 shore fined giflh‘k’hufi mam and-Q'hex’efirt decrease 5. Genghis Khan, the ruler of the Mongols, lived 800 years ago, or about 32 ”‘th Minion generations ago (assuming 25 years per generation). Y chromosome "fitness. which evidence suggests that he and his near relatively currently have about 30 mm dd“ .9“; million (3 x 107) male descendants. and: out-69%: 1% . a) Let us assume that Genghis Khan was the sole male ancestor of all these (30 Fed people (that is, that he had the only copy of the Y chromosome that was the ancestor of the chromosomes of those 30 million descendants. What is the intrinsic rate of increase r per generation for Genghis Khan’s male descendants, assuming that his descendants increased in numbers exponentially? Show your calculations. (5 points) 1’ = ‘57. general-ions N+ = Nee"..- \‘L‘fi- axib“ "e \e ) tints-no?) = Merv”) in beld“) " 574* ‘Lté In LSMD‘) = V" 52 ( 90: general-Con) Name b) The Earth's population in Genghis Khan’s time was about 100 million (108). It is now about 6 billion (6 x 109). What is the intrinsic rate of increase for our species as a whole? Show your calculations. (5 points) +=fiCOtdenrs m = Nazi" ram) @xlo‘ a (lxl0e3-e twlo“ awe = e. \xlo‘?’ one" 1 em? = l’\ ‘n ( Into“ 3 l “W" = $30ch “( IMO“) 5H0? ' \n ( lxic‘ ) g I" f 500 0.005 -.:. r' L er ear) 9 ‘3 Name 7‘ Give one reason why we know that the Neanderthals are more distant relatives of ours than the Cro-Magnon peoples who displaced the Neanderthals in Europe 30— 40,000 years ago? Be specific (5 points). Scientists have been able +0 leak. ad-mHochm-xdfiol fine dE-er‘fl W1 sexual “accuses er?- hominid; and «rush Ithe use; “Fa-mafia markers and'bflA sequencivq , wax) were dd: +0 cons-kud- Ph‘ikxienfic he; Mattedod-e 44m: gamma? genetic am with +h<. Mod-Ne Aimee oFd‘wergenQEs. 1+ oppeon; M (In: .. Magma people: who dfie‘aloced 4m: Nada—km: ‘m Sump: 30.oc>o~—4c,t>oo gem-x: ago one mow. dew-:1 Haul-ed to was ththeir branch is much Shot-her and more clustered around our branch 4km +hg Married-km; , The Meander-Hula and #:3de humans We d‘w‘oroIzd Rum a comma 0.“ch r "i‘ot‘ earlier ondflnmfi'cxe, had accumulated mm (“Mom %m%1%_uqan no“ pepples , which is uxelqined Eng-Heir \oncaer bt'undn . 8. An environment’s carrying capacity for species 1, K1, is 500, and its carrying capacity for species 2, K2, is also 500. You census the environment, and find that there are 300 members of species 1 and 300 members of species 2 living in it. a) If you make the assumption that the numbers of these two species have reached an internal equilibrium, are the competition coefficients (112 and (121 for the two species greater than, equal to, or less than one? (4 points) ‘3‘”. <1 and D(2| 4| '—3 hegemhmegr’thdrwn niches NH“ 0.3m.“ overlap o-F-Hne. «we. niches b) Explain your reasoning. (5 points) "The Compefificn coe-Ffideni-s are, \ess {hon one. mmge, g H 8‘3ng are obte +0 coexisl~ ad'equifibfl‘um and because. -|-he 'hfi'qj number op , (be 9499‘)“ ‘03 asvirapnxufl') A oi-naanigmg +hq+ can exist' Oct-the. equiltbnum Poitfi- KS: greed-er «than i-F 2%” had cxiS‘l'Ccl alone. 1-? q! n. = ecu -= | -—9 ~l-hzx3 Shore. Some. em\o%ica\ ntdne. and MRQ canmfi- coexKSi‘ indefinttelj W- “ u.) l 0“ 0‘2“? l —> one drives-the. other but immedio-i-d ~'—'—— Freddie‘s/pres) irvtex’uctim 9. Give an example of an organism, phenotype or behavior produced by the following types of selection Explain the role of selection in each case. (16 points) li-lhrouah a) Sexual selection a an example c? 36¢qu galactic“ is Mae. squad dimorphism apparent in man-.5 bird species ,‘ came.“ +he, pm . Hates are iguana much Inert moment-ed in heir Plummqae (mom. pancbdgs have bigger and more. bdcat‘rflj motored “1213\3) because kinda Pram (which have. nut-hing‘to do uirth suwiwlt) “ONE SEACC‘iEd ‘Pbc finalist with Weir (>hcnchjpe. b) Selection for inclusive fitness : m mechanism oil—unis 36¢ch (also known as kin sdecficn\ tflsuHs in oMm‘ietic boa-momma afiengeen in eugenim communities a?- bfies and as“: . We: “Fannie mm: have. high (he‘Fchcxd-g c? radcdntss +0 each ether, satiation ‘Fbr inclusive €40qu justifies wtxns-theg are ubifling‘l'b be sterile. and wot-Lh’kgd ‘Vne amup . A Whough «\htnj counci- @‘Uduce, Mg u“ help raise. a sister as “the new queen (r = 5/4) who um hone. erWspfinas and eosgon—er genes wag-«:3 Smi 11mg inminfi «he indus‘we fitness; eG-the sisters ds'the qufifih - c) Selection for reciprocal altruism .- quich‘c bchmrior can arise dug +9 56:05:,“ pv- redemcox uH-misvn because; individuols neg-(“\‘H'fis ‘kjpx’. oi: behcwbr can aid Awe survival. c?- on orfite awn? , ‘hm‘fizfi-‘Vfl Pmbqbua'kl OV-mwwol ctrokhcr mmbcx: who’dsg: ennui oneJu; mdfibufimj ‘b‘l‘his bdwmrbv . Furl-hmrt, as \onq ox m {2 tom fish cud high dwelt CT" WQVDCQfim WW6 Ivdiuidunvs d) Selection for mutualistic interactions , “dime: 56M°“Rr “chm“ NEW Will pessick Pm em‘fle c?- reciprcaad oH-mkm is +he anr‘g dhcm- mo game. An exampk: d?- selccficn ‘For mu'hhfid’fc itfifirnciims if; WeirdePenderfi- eyom'rion 0% (ii-Farad- ‘hjpeq d‘dichcns Rom warm Pin: 69 Fungus, and alga «negate. We: fiais-hjpe o? selecfion rank in benefit: Fer both catechism: ' 'd- is Q hacmbsa retom‘oushie M can Rom“ Weir Survival 0nd a\\ows any“ h mpg niches --H\cd-— nehhtx" ¢xgoml§vn cam 010“2 (hm, Mira Mir coor- lcgiml mfifiefl - Eco\c>3{cu\ niches oPlidxum : can \‘we in mogl- ext-me cswiramem such as ruck sur'Pucm in Mdfij wanes as. w\ cu; we condfl-ions and mefi— min'Pcrwls How are +hesj 030w. ix: 66.9% in £0295 planks lichens hex: ofiAngql mm‘sooufl-h‘l‘ prom‘des shun-ex- and abgavbg nwfi-n'euh b3 merging as-H‘yg (hgplnqg) and enclaql cgmpo\\€n'\' wca- under-3w: Mtgufixtsig +5 Pmduct «genie mfifienh Lu : WW JEor flu“! and 1h: magma I ...
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