C1_2 - 1. ABSTRACT The main objective of this experiment is...

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1. ABSTRACT The main objective of this experiment is to determine the tensile properties of three metal specimens, namely T10, R10 and Aluminum. In the experiment, a tensometer was used to increase load supply to the metals until fracture occurred. Testing software is used to plot the graphs of load against elongation for the three specimens. From the graphs, we can obtain - Limit of proportionality stress - Yield or 0.2% proof stress - Ultimate strength - Percentage elongation - Percentage reduction of area - Young’s Modulus Hence, we can compare the properties of the three specimens from the obtained results. 2. INTRODUCTION 1
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In all engineering construction, the component parts of a structure must be properly proportioned to resist the actual or probable forces that may be imposed upon them. In many instances, the composite structure needs to be rigid and not deflect excessively when under imposed loads during operation. So the ability to determine the maximum load that a slender rod can carry before fracture occurs is of great importance. The study of the tensile properties of ferrous and non-ferrous metals covers the study of the strength of materials. The most commonly way to define the strength of a material is to plot a curve of the load applied to the material ( stress, σ ) against the elongation resulting from the load applied ( strain, ε ). Furthermore, analytical methods are involved in this experiment to determine the strength, ductility and stability of the various load carrying members, from the Stress-Strain Curve . 3. OBJECTIVE This experiment involves letting the given round metal bars undergo tension test, which is a method of determining the behaviour of materials under axial stretch load. Various mechanical properties of the metals can be obtained from the test including 2
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- Elastic limit - Elongation - Modulus of elasticity - Proportional limit - Reduction in area - Tensile strength - Yield point - Yield strength 4. THEORY 4.1. Tensile Stress, σ Tensile Stress , σ is defined by the relationship σ = F / A o 3
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where F is the instantaneous load applied perpendicular to the specimen cross-section. A o is the original cross-sectional area before any load is applied. Unit of σ is N / m 2 or MPa (1 MPa = 10 6 N / m 2 ). 4.2. Tensile Strain, ε Tensile Strain , ε is defined according to ε = ( l i l o ) / l o = ∆l / l o where ∆l is the deformation elongation or change in length at some instant, as referenced to the original length. l o is the original length before any load is applied. ε is unitless. 4.3. Young's Modulus or Modulus of Elasticity, E Young's Modulus of a material is defined as the ratio of stress to strain E = stress / strain = σ / ε Unit of E is N / m 2 or GPa (1 GPa = 10 9 N / m 2 ). Young's Modulus is applicable to elastic materials within the proportional limit, i.e.
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This note was uploaded on 10/18/2009 for the course ECONS 111 taught by Professor Yo during the Spring '09 term at Nassau CC.

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C1_2 - 1. ABSTRACT The main objective of this experiment is...

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