E1_Equipotentials and Electric Fields

E1_Equipotentials and Electric Fields - Formal Report for...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–5. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Formal Report for Experiment No. E1 Equipotentials and Electric Fields Session 2007/2008 Name : Luo Mingxu 2007-9-19 Group : AL 20 FE1071 – Experiment No. E1: Equipotentials and Electric Fields Luo Mingxu (Group AL20)
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
NANYANG TECHNOLOGICAL UNIVERSITY First Year Common Engineering Course First Year Laboratory B (S2-B4a-01)
Background image of page 2
Contents i. Introduction 2 a) Background Information b) Objectives ii. Experiment 4 a) Equipment b) Procedure iii. iv. Further Discussion 8 v. Conclusion 10 vi. Reference 11 vii. Appendix (Log Sheet) 12 Introduction Background information FE1071 – Experiment No. E1: Equipotentials and Electric Fields Luo Mingxu (Group AL20)
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Imagine two electrodes of any shape apart carrying equal and opposite charges. There will appear a fixed potential difference or voltage between two electrodes. Suppose that this potential difference is 10V. If the electrode with the negative charge is assumed to be at zero potential, then the electrode with the positive charge is at a potential of +10V. Given these assumptions, in the space surrounding these electrodes there will exist points that are at the same potential. For example, for the case described above, there will exist some points for which the potential is +2V, other points for which the potential is +5V. In a three-dimensional space, all points at the same potential form a surface, and there will be a different surface for each value of the potential between 0V and 10V. In fact, there will exist an infinite number of such surfaces because one could divide the 10V total potential difference into an infinite number of steps. Each of these surfaces with the same value of potential is called an equipotential surface . In this experiment, the equipotentials for a few simple, but often used, electrode configurations will be determined. In addition to the equipotential surfaces that exist in the region around charged electrodes, an electric field is also present. By definition, electric field is a vector field, which can be represented by lines drawn from the positively charged electrode to the negatively charged electrode. The direction of the electric field lines at every point in space is the direction of the force that would be exerted on a positive test charge placed at that point in space. To ensure that the test charge does not disturb the other charges, the test charge must be small. In fact, in the exact definition, the limit must be taken as the test charge approaches zero. The magnitude of the electric field is the force per unit charge acting on the positive test charge as the magnitude of the test charge approaches zero. The units of electric field are N/C. The number of field lines per unit area at a given point is a measure of the magnitude of the electric field. Thus, a region where there are a large number of lines per unit area is a region of large electric field. The electric field lines must always exist in a fixed geometrical relationship with the
Background image of page 4
Image of page 5
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 10/18/2009 for the course ECONS 111 taught by Professor Yo during the Spring '09 term at Nassau CC.

Page1 / 14

E1_Equipotentials and Electric Fields - Formal Report for...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 5. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online