Lect22 - Bacteriophage and viruses can be vectors of...

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Bacteriophage and viruses can be vectors of heritable change
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Learning Goals Students will learn the basic structure of viruses. Capsid Envelope Nucleic acid (DNA or RNA) Students will know that there are different kinds of viruses. Students will understand that all types of cells are susceptible to viruses, bacteria, archaea, eukarya Students will understand that viruses require some of the host’s replication machinery in order to complete their life cycles. Students will be able to break down the viral life cycle in to early, late, and lysis/lysogeny stages. Attachment Entry Replication Translation Assembly Release
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Features of a virus infectious, obligate, intracellular parasite small; 25 to 900 nm in diameter package their genomes inside a shell genomes of DNA or RNA The genomes contain information for initiating and completing an infectious cycle The virus replicates inside the host, parasitizes necessary host functions and directs the synthesis of new virion components.
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Viruses (bacteriophage) are ubiquitous All known life forms are infected by viruses There are 107 viral particles per ml of sea water (likely bacteriophages) bacteriophage plant virus animal virus
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Classification of Host range Size/shape of virion Genome properties: Nucleic acid (DNA/RNA) Single/double stranded Linear/circular
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Viral structures Capsid - Protective shell around the virion Nucleic Acid- genomic information Envelope (eukaryotic viruses)- lipid coat about the virion
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Capsid Made of protein Protection from temperature, chemical and physical damage Important in delivering the viral nucleic acid into the host.
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Capsid structure Icosohedron: Made of 20 equilateral triangles, each with one capsomer (structural subunit) Helical (filament): Capsomers arranged as a hollow spiral Isolated capsomers will self-assemble into the shape of the virion
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Envelope Primarily present on animal viruses Made of lipids,carbohydrates, and proteins. Lipids and carbohydrates taken from the host on extrusion. Capsids can be non-enveloped or encased in an envelope
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QuickTime™ and a TIFF (Uncompressed) decompressor are needed to see this picture.
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Lect22 - Bacteriophage and viruses can be vectors of...

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