pacs_sociobio

pacs_sociobio - PACS 125AC Socio-Biography of War, Cultural...

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PACS 125AC Socio-Biography of War, Cultural and Society 11/17/08 My family’s tradition is relation to war is quite complicated, defined by many aspects of both societal and personal beliefs. I have found the most ardent viewpoints to be those of my maternal grandparents, which contradict one another. My grandfather has glorified war, yet unbeknownst to me. This is because he was divorced before I was born and I have grown up in the company of my socialist democratic grandmother and her husband. Their anti-war position and political stance have been instilled in me. An added aspect to my beliefs has come from my parental grandfather, who participated in the World War II. He however did not pass to my father a tradition of war as glory, but rather a sense a duty. The essence of my personal narrative reveals the overriding theme of American history: that it is intertwined with war. Personal and cultural beliefs always accompany these wars, and together they dictate society. Thus, generation after generation, a member of society’s history has undoubtedly been affected by war. Part one of my personal narrative will disclose my family tradition is relation to war, part two will place these traditions is historical context, and part three will conclude with my personal beliefs in accordance.
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I. Family Tradition and War When I began to research my family history, I decided to start with my father’s lineage, whose story appeared less convoluted than my mother’s. My father’s grandfather immigrated from Ireland immediately following the First World War and settled in Philadelphia in a predominately Irish immigrant community. He there had two sons, one being my grandfather, Joseph Richard Morgan. He died when I was ten years old, so I only have my father’s memories to utilize. Joe was a very conservative Catholic man, and my father describes his sentimentality in accordance; he was a strict father who rarely showed emotion. Therefore, he rarely talked about his experience in the war and his feelings surrounding the war, but I can infer through his actions and my father’s learned values. When World War II began, Joe enlisted in the Army with several of his friends who lived in the same neighborhood. He was assigned to the Army Signal Core and was stationed in Panama throughout the entirety of the war. When he returned home, he began working for the Post Office, married, and had two children, Joseph Jr. and Kathleen. They lived in the suburbs of Philadelphia in a “blue collar working class community,” as my father describes. Growing up, my father had a paper route and an after-school job. He often claims his father taught him the lesson of hard work. Considering Joe’s voluntary personal
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involvement in the war and government job afterwards, I believe that he saw himself having patriotic values and performing his duty to his country. The American dream of the self made man seemed more predominant in his life than any notion of honoring war. After the start of the Vietnam War, my father had just started
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pacs_sociobio - PACS 125AC Socio-Biography of War, Cultural...

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