Modeling Moving Objects for Location Based Services.

Modeling Moving Objects for Location Based Services. -...

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Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2002 Modeling Moving Objects for Location Based Services Ouri Wolfson 1 , Sam Chamberlain 2 , Kostas Kalpakis 3 , Yelena Yesha 3 1 Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, University of Illinois, Chicago, IL, 60607, USA wolfson@eecs.uic.edu 2 Army Research Laboratories, Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD USA 3 University of Maryland, Baltimore County, 1000 Hilltop Circle Baltimore, MD 21250 USA Abstract. As prices of basic enabling equipment like smart cell phones, hand holds, wireless modems, and GPS devices continue to drop rapidly, International Data Corp (IDC) predicts that the number of wireless subscribers worldwide will soar to 1.1 billion in 2003. Spurred by the combination of expensive new location-based infrastructure and an enormous market of mobile users, companies will roll out new wireless applications to re-coop their technology investments and increase customer loyalty and switching costs. These applications are collectively called location-based services. In this position paper we outline a novel and comprehensive model for moving objects in location based services. The model is different than other models proposed in the literature in the sense that is captures the spatial, temporal, and uncertain aspects of the location of a moving object. These aspects are captured in the concept of a trajectory. We argue that the existing prevalent model in industry, point location management, has severe drawbacks, and explain why our trajectory model solves these problems. We also outline a set of operators to access the trajectories database. 1. Introduction In 1996, the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) mandated that all wireless carriers offer a 911 service with the ability to pinpoint the location of callers making emergency requests. This requirement is forcing wireless operators to roll out costly new infrastructure that provides location data about mobile devices. In part to facilitate the rollout of these services, in May 2000, the U.S. government stopped jamming the signals from global positioning system (GPS) satellites for use in civilian applications, dramatically improving the accuracy of GPS-based location data to 50- 100 meters. As prices of basic enabling equipment like smart cell phones, hand holds, wireless modems, and GPS devices and services continue to drop rapidly, International Data Corp (IDC) predicts that the number of wireless subscribers worldwide will soar to 1.1 billion in 2003. Spurred by the combination of expensive new location-based infrastructure and an enormous market of mobile users, companies will roll out new wireless applications to re-coop their technology investments and increase customer
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Modeling Moving Objects for Location Based Services 47 loyalty and switching costs. These applications are collectively called location-based services. Emerging commercial location-based services fall into one of the following two
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Modeling Moving Objects for Location Based Services. -...

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