Mobile-IP - Security issues

Mobile-IP- - Mobile IP Security Issues Current State of Mobile Computing Mobile computers are one of the fastest growing segments of the PC market

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Mobile IP: Security Issues
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2 Current State of Mobile Computing Mobile computers are one of the fastest growing segments of the PC market Short-range wireless networks (Bluetooth) available from IBM, Toshiba, Dell, HP… High-speed (11 Mbps) wireless LAN products are now easily and cheaply available (IEEE 802.11a, IEEE 802.11b) Low speed (currently 128 Kbps) Metropolitan Area Wireless Network services are available in some cities and spreading (Metricom’s Ricochet)
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3 Mobile Computers’ Characteristics May change point of network connection frequently May be in use as point of network connection changes Usually have less powerful CPU, less memory and disk space Less secure physically Limited battery power
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4 Wireless Networks’ Characteristics Generally lower bandwidth Higher latency and variability Higher error rate More susceptible to interference and eavesdropping
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5 Outline of the Lectures Part 0: TCP/IP Primer Part 1: The Need for Mobile IP Part 2: Mobile IP Overview (for IPv4) Part 3: Security Issues A Simple Mobile IP Application (Private Network without Internet connection) A More Complicated Application: Internet-Wide Mobility
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6 Part 0: TCP/IP Primer A protocol suite widely used for internetworking (in the Internet). Has made possible communication over a global Internet. Makes two hosts communicate despite their hardware differences. Both hosts and routers need to run TCP/IP protocol software.
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7 Part 0: TCP/IP … Internetworking: to provide seamless communications. IP Addressing: -Each host is assigned a 32 bit unique address. -A packet contains the address of source and destination. IP Address Hierarchy: -32 bit address divided into two parts: -- A prefix and a suffix (two level hierarchy).
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8 The IP Address Hierarchy…. The prefix: identifies the physical network. The suffix: identifies the individual computer. Such addressing scheme is tremendous help in routing. Dotted Decimal Notation: -Treats each octet as an unsigned integer. Example: 128.55.0.23
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9 IP Addressing … Routers are also assigned IP addresses. A router may have multiple addresses.
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10 IP Addressing… Address Resolution Protocol (ARP): (mapping from an abstract address to physical location.) o A request message contains the IP address. o A response message contains the both, the IP address and the hardware address. O A request message is broadcast, but response messages are directed. -Responses are cached (used later).
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11 IP Data (Packet) Forwarding TCP/IP supports both connectionless and connection-oriented services. Fundamental mode: connectionless. -Each packet travels independently. (Reliable connection-oriented service uses the
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This note was uploaded on 10/19/2009 for the course CNT 5517 taught by Professor Helal during the Fall '09 term at University of Florida.

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Mobile-IP- - Mobile IP Security Issues Current State of Mobile Computing Mobile computers are one of the fastest growing segments of the PC market

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