lec56%20genome%20evol%203 - 2/23/09! Genome Evolution! The...

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2/23/09 1 Genome Evolution The human genome has been sequenced. How much of it codes for exons (i.e., regions of genes that code for proteins, rRNA, or tRNA)? A) 1.5% B) 12.5% C) 24% D) 78% E) 98% The human genome has been sequenced. How much of it codes for exons (i.e., regions of genes that code for proteins, rRNA, or tRNA)? A) 1.5% * B) 12.5% C) 24% D) 78% E) 98% Gene duplication can give rise to gene families, usually with related functions Chromosome evolution can be revealed by analyzing shared sequence location
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2/23/09 2 Example of exon shuffling (errors in meiotic recombination) Transposable elements (TEs), mobile genetic elements, contribute to genome evolution As cells divide, TEs can move into the pigmentation gene to disrupt it, and can move back out again. Sectors are created with different pigmentation Barbara McClintock (1902-1992) Cornell: BA (1923), PhD (1927), instructor (1927-1931), research associate (1934-1936). Nobel Prize in 1983. Where does the
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This note was uploaded on 10/20/2009 for the course BIO G 1102 taught by Professor Walcott during the Spring '08 term at Cornell University (Engineering School).

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lec56%20genome%20evol%203 - 2/23/09! Genome Evolution! The...

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