Lec%2068%20Plant%20Dev%202%2009 - 3/27/09 1 Plant...

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Unformatted text preview: 3/27/09 1 Plant Development II Plant Development II In which plant group is the sporophyte most dominant? A) moss B) fern C) hornwort D) liverwort E) charophytes In which plant group is the sporophyte most dominant? A) moss B) fern C) hornwort D) liverwort E) charophytes * 3/27/09 2 Pollination Syndromes An orchid that mimics a female wasp With predictable results http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-h8I3cqpgnA Self-Fertility Tobacco is self-fertile and there is no need for pol inators This can be an advantage, but reliance on self fertilization reduces genetic variability. Tobacco can also use pol inators to outcross Hawkmoth on Datura Outcrossing insurance 1) Stamens and carpels may develop at different times in the same flower 2) Heterosyly: pin (style prominent) and thrum (stamens prominent) flowers 3) Different staminate and carpel ate flowers on the same, or different, plants Poplar staminate and carpel ate flowers Primula thrum (left) and pin flowers Heterosis (hybrid vigor) Genetically superior offspring sometimes result from crossing inbred lines Darwin suggested the possibility Genetic basis is still strongly debated detasseling maize to prevent incrossing A B C D A &D are inbred lines B&C are male<->female hybrids Heterosis (hybrid vigor)...
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Lec%2068%20Plant%20Dev%202%2009 - 3/27/09 1 Plant...

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