Ch_322b_18.07

Ch_322b_18.07 - Chapter 18.7 lecture note

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Some Important Derivatives of Carboxylic Acids Esters RCOR' O = examples CH 3 CO CH 2 CH 3 O ethyl acet ate CH 3 CH 2 CO CCH 3 CH 3 CH 3 O tert-butyl propan oate CO CH 3 O methyl benz oate CH 3 CH 2 OCCH 2 CO CH 2 CH 3 O O diethyl malon ate Esters are named as derivatives of the corresponding carboxylic acid. The alkyl or aryl name of the R' group is given first followed by the root of the name of the carboxylic acid with an "ate" or "oate" ending.
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Physical Properties of Esters Esters are polar compounds . But because they do not have protic H, they have lower boiling points than alcohols and carboxylic acids of comparable molecular weight. CH 3 CO 2 CH 2 CH 3 CH 3 CH 2 CH 2 COOH CH 3 CH 2 CH 2 CH 2 CH 2 OH mp -82 o C -6 o C -78.5 o C bp 77 o C 164 o C 138 o C water solubility 7.4 2.4 g/100 mL 8 ethyl acetate butanoic acid 1-pentanol
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Esters as Perfumes and Flavoring Agents Many esters have pleasant odors and tastes and are used in perfumes and as flavoring agents. A number of these compounds occur in nature where they are responsible for the characteristic odor of fruits. CH
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This note was uploaded on 10/20/2009 for the course CHEM 322BL at USC.

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Ch_322b_18.07 - Chapter 18.7 lecture note

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