Ch_322b_22.01

Ch_322b_22.01 - monosaccharides. maltose one mole H 3 O + H...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–3. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Chapter 22 Carbohydrates Carbohydrates The name carbohydrates is derived from the general formula C x (H 2 O) y that seems to suggest "hydrates of carbon." Structurally, they are polyhydroxylated aldehydes or ketones that exist in cyclic hemiacetal or acetal forms. Some Important Terminology for Carbohydrates The terms carbohydrate , saccharide and sugar all mean the same thing and are used interchangeably. Saccharide comes from the word for "sugar" in several languages: sarkara in Sanskrit, sakcharon in Greek, saccharum in Latin.
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Monosaccharide A carbohydrate that cannot be hydrolyzed to a simpler structure. Disaccharide A carbohydrate that can be hydrolyzed to two
Background image of page 2
Background image of page 3
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Unformatted text preview: monosaccharides. maltose one mole H 3 O + H 2 O glucose two moles Oligosaccharide A carbohydrate that can be hydrolyzed to a small number (up to 10) of monosaccharides. Polysaccharide A carbohydrate that can be hydrolyzed to a large number of monosaccharides. starch a polymer H 3 O + H 2 O glucose many moles Some Additional Terms aldose ketose triose tetrose aldopentose a carbohydrate that contains an aldehyde group a carbohydrate that contains a ketone group a carbohydrate with three carbons a carbohydrate with four carbons a five carbon carbohydrate with an aldehyde group...
View Full Document

Page1 / 3

Ch_322b_22.01 - monosaccharides. maltose one mole H 3 O + H...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 3. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online