Buddhism Lecture 11

Buddhism Lecture 11 - M T V Buddhism T heravada M ahayana V...

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Unformatted text preview: M T V Buddhism T heravada M ahayana V ajrayana 7th C. 2nd C. The 6th century saw the emergence of a Buddhist movement known as Tantra (warp, thread, fabric, woven, power) Vajrayana ("The Vehicle of the Thunderbolt") Mantrayana ("The Vehicle of Sacred Chants") Vajrayana Buddhism, the vehicle or method of the vajra . Vajra stands for the perfection of wisdom, pure mind, reality-as-it-is, which, like space, is unconquerable. It is symbolized by the indestructible clarity of the diamond. Vajrayana, then, means the Supreme Vehicle , Vajrayana Buddhism/Tantric Buddhism Tantric Buddhism was based on a radical extension of the doctrine of Emptiness. The term points to a woven interconnectedness of experience whereby the body, speech, and mind of the tantric practitioner are brought into a unique harmony that is directed toward the achievement of buddhahood. In general the tantric path is to be distinguished from the more gradual paths toward awakening, as tantric practice aims at attaining buddhahood in a short time as possible. Vajrayana Buddhism/Tantric Buddhism The Tantric tradition argued that if everything is empty, there is no practical difference between the serenity of the Buddha and destructive feelings, such as anger or passion, and there is no difference between the sexes. Wrathful deity Vajrayana Buddhism/Tantric Buddhism These conclusions produced strikingly new ways of representing and thinking about the Buddha. The Buddha was depicted as a wrathful deity and as the intimate union of male and female. The Tantric approach to Emptiness also produced strikingly new forms of ritual and meditation and unconventional images of the lifestyle of a Buddhist saint. Vajrayana is often described as the completed dharma, because it absorbed the doctrines of both Theravada and Mahayana and also embraced north Indian Tantra. In addition to the elevated intellectual activity of the monasteries in Indian Buddhism, on the fringes of Indian civilization, in the impure and frightening space of the cremation ground, another vision of Buddhist practice began slowly to emerge. This is later known as Tantra. Vajrayana Buddhism/Tantric Buddhism Tantric Buddhism began to emerge in India during the sixth century of the common era. 1. Tantra is found not only in Buddhism but also in Hinduism and in other Indian religious traditions. 2. Tantric Buddhism were esoteric, placed great emphasis on ritual, and used magical and antinomian symbols and practices, which, they claimed, enabled the spiritual seeker to achieve rapid results not possible by other methods. Yab-yum Vajrayana Buddhism/Tantric Buddhism The earlier forms of Tantric Buddhism spread to China and Japan (and are still carried on in Japan by the Tendai and Shingon sects)....
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Buddhism Lecture 11 - M T V Buddhism T heravada M ahayana V...

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