Buddhism Lecture 15

Buddhism Lecture 15 - Buddhist Ethics Scholars sometimes...

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Buddhist Ethics
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The term ‘ethics’ is used to cover: 1. Thought on the bases and justification of moral guidelines (normative ethics), and on the meaning of moral terms (meta-ethics); 1. Specific moral guidelines (applied ethics); 1. How people actually behave (descriptive ethics). Dictionary definition of Ethic: a system of moral standards or principles Scholars sometimes define Buddhism as a ‘Code of Ethics’ Neither a religion nor a philosophy!
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Buddhist canonical texts have no term that directly translates into the English word ethics; the closest term is S la ī (moral discipline). Morality (s la) is one of the threefold ī disciplines, along with wisdom (paññ ) and ā mental cultivation (sam dhi), which ā constitute the path leading to the end of suffering. Morality (s la) ī is most closely identified with the widely known five moral PRECEPTS of lay Buddhists: not to kill, not to steal, not to lie, not to have inappropriate sex, and not to use intoxicants. Ethics in Buddhism
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The Buddhist tradition has a notion of voluntary and gradualist moral expectations: Ethics in Buddhism Lay take 5 or 8 precepts Monks take over 227 vows Novices take over 10 vows Nuns take 8/10 vows Bhikkhunis take 311 vows
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Buddhists have rich resources on ethical thinking, especially in the written materials communicating the dharma. The 3 major divisions of the Buddhist scriptural CANON all contain ethical materials. The SUTRA contain moral teachings and ethical reflection; the VINAYA gives moral and behavioral rules for ordained Buddhists, and the ABHIDHARMA literature explores the psychology of morality. In addition to canonical literature, numerous commentaries and treatises of Buddhist schools contain ethical reflections. Sources of Ethical thinking
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Ethics is a major part of the Buddhist PATH that leads to the end of suffering. The path is sometimes conceived of as a threefold training (Morality provides the foundation for Meditation and Wisdom). In the noble eightfold path, Morality includes the practices of right action, right speech, and right livelihood. The practice of moral discipline is supportive of the other practices in the path. Ethics as a part of Path Morality Meditation Wisdo m
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Ā path that leads to better REBIRTH and the noble path that leads to NIRV NA. Ā On the ordinary path a person is partly motivated by what is gained through ethical action. On the noble path a person is gradually freed from the false idea of the self and from selfish motivations. An ARHAT who has completed the ordinary path is on the noble path; he or she is beyond ethics and KARMA (ACTION) in the sense that the arhat spontaneously acts morally, and his or her actions no longer have good or bad karmic fruits. The
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This note was uploaded on 10/21/2009 for the course ACTG 12 at Santa Clara.

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Buddhism Lecture 15 - Buddhist Ethics Scholars sometimes...

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