{[ promptMessage ]}

Bookmark it

{[ promptMessage ]}

Chapter 10 review - Chapter 9 Payroll Taxes Current Ratio...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–4. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Chapter 9 Payroll Taxes - Current Ratio - An important indicator of a company’s ability to meet its current  obligations - Current Assets / Current Liability =  Current ratio Account payable turnover ratio - Measures how quickly management is paying trade accounts - Cost of goods sold/ Average account payable =  Accounts payable  turnover ratio Notes payable Contingent Liability - Potential liabilities that arise because of events or transactions that  have already occurred. Working capital - =  Current assets- current liabilities
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
- Long-term liabilities - Creditors often require the borrower to pledge specific assets as  security for the long-term liability. - Significant debt needs are often filled by issuing bonds to the public - Relatively small amounts can be filled by Banks, Insurance company,  pension plan Operating and Capital Leases - Operating Leases: Short-term leases; no liabilities or assets.  - Capital leases: Long-term leases; meets one of the 4 criteria; results in o Capital Lease Criteria     o 1. Lease term is 75% or more of the asset’s expected economic life. o 2. Ownership of asset is transferred to lessee at end of lease. o 3. Lease permits lessee to purchase the asset at a price that is  lower than its fair market value. o 4. The present value of the lease payments is 90% or more of the  fair market value of the asset when the lease is signed. Chapter 9 Present Value - The present value of a single amount is the worth to you today of receiving that amount  some time in the future. - An annuity  is a series of consecutive equal periodic payments. - Present Value X interest rate =  Interest Chapter 10 Bonds - Are long-term debt.  - Advantages of bonds:     - Stockholders maintain control because bonds are debt, not equity. - Interest expense is tax deductible. - The impact on earnings is positive because money can often be  borrowed at a low interest rate and invested at a higher interest rate. - Disadvantages of bonds:    
Background image of page 2
- Risk of bankruptcy exists because the interest and debt must be paid  back as scheduled or creditors will force legal action. - Negative impact on cash flows exists because interest and principal  must be repaid in the future. - Vocabulary     - 1.  Face Value (Maturity or Par Value, Principal)  - 2.  Maturity Date - 3.  Stated Interest Rate   - 4.  Interest Payment Dates - 5.  Bond Date - Other Factors: - 6.  Market Interest Rate - 7.  Issue Date - Types of bonds o Debenture: an unsecured bond; no assets are specifically pledged  to guarantee repayment.  o Callable bonds: may be called for early retirement at the option of  the issuer.  o Convertible bonds: may be converted to other securities of the  issuer (usually common stock).
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Image of page 4
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}