ch 5 - Chapter 5 - Stereochemistry Non-superimposable...

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Chapter 5 - Stereochemistry
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Non-superimposable mirror images Left and right hands are mirror images of each other. Molecules can be related to each other in the same manner. They are chiral molecules, called enantiomers.
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Methane as an introduction to stereoisomerism Let’s talk about a small molecule that we have now heard a lot about. Our friend methane. We have X-ray data to prove that carbon attached to four substituents is tetrahedral. In 1874 in the Netherlands, J. H. van’t Hoff proposed the tetrahedral carbon center based upon evidence related to isomer number 2-bromobutane resulting from the monobromination of butane at one of the secondary carbons, exists as two stereoisomeric forms.
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2-Bromobutane Enantiomers of 2-bromobutane
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Planes of Symmetry Symmetry in a molecule helps to distinguish chiral from achiral. Chiral molecules have no mirror plane.
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Why is nature chiral? Or HOW is nature chiral…?
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ch 5 - Chapter 5 - Stereochemistry Non-superimposable...

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