Analysis_of_Linkage_Mechanisms_P2.7

Analysis_of_Linkage_Mechanisms_P2.7 - Table of Contents...

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Unformatted text preview: Table of Contents Title Page No Objectives 1 Introduction 1 Literature Review 1 Theory 4 Analytical Studies 14 Computer Simulation 15 Discussion 15 References 15 Appendix 16 1 1. Objectives The purpose of this project is to reinforce students understanding on fundamentals of kinematics through the analysis of some simple planar linkage mechanisms and give students hands-on experience with the PC software program called Working Model 2D. 2. Introduction The function of a link mechanism is to produce rotating, oscillating, or reciprocation motion from the rotation of a crank or vice versa. A resistant body or a group of resistant bodies with rigid connections preventing their relative movement is known as a link. A link may also be defined as a member or a combination of members of a mechanism, connecting other members and having motion relative to them. Thus a link may consist of one or more resistant bodies. One of the simplest examples of a constrained linkage is the four-link mechanism. A few examples of four-link mechanisms would be a four-bar linkage mechanism and the slider-crank mechanism. 3. Literature Review 3.1 Four Bar Linkage The four bar linkage is the simplest and often times, the most useful mechanism. A mechanism composed of rigid bodies and lower pairs is called a linkage. The simplest closed-loop linkage is the four bar linkage which has four members, three moving links, one fixed link and four pin joints. A linkage that has at least one fixed link is a mechanism. A four bar linkage comprises four bar-shaped links and four turning pairs as shown in Figure 1. Figure 1: Four-bar linkage showing paths traced by moving pivots A and B, and coupler point C Link 1 is the ground link (sometimes called the frame or fixed link), and is assumed to be motionless. Links 2 and 4 each rotate relative to the ground link about fixed pivots (A 0 2 and B ). Link 3 is called the coupler link, and is the only link that can trace paths of arbitrary shape (because it is not rotating about a fixed pivot). Usually one of the "grounded links" (link 2 or 4) serves as the input link, which is the link which may either be turned by hand, or perhaps driven by an electric motor or a hydraulic or pneumatic cylinder. If link 2 is the input link, then link 4 is called the follower link, because its rotation merely follows the motion as determined by the input and coupler link motion. If link 2 is the input link and its possible range of motion is unlimited, it is called a crank, and the linkage is called a crank-rocker. Crank-rockers are very useful because the input link can be rotated continuously while a point on its coupler traces a closed complex curve. 3.2 Slider-crank Mechanism A slider-crank mechanism, as shown in Figure 2, converts the reciprocating motion of a slider into a rotary motion of the crank or vice-versa....
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Analysis_of_Linkage_Mechanisms_P2.7 - Table of Contents...

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