Lecture 3 outline - GMUS 203: Music in America Lecture 3:...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–3. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
GMUS 203: Music in America Lecture 3: Ballads and Folk Music EUROPEAN COLONIZATION - French: - Spanish - English: eastern see board, economic freedom THE BALLAD TRADITION Popular narrative song Known in Europe since Middle Ages - especially British Isles Sung in stanzas (usually 4 lines) to a strophic tune (repeating) Pentatonic or modal design Circulated orally Topics: war, birth and death, life struggles, romance BALLAD TYPES From U.S. perspective: Imported - May undergo slight variation Naturalized - New text and/or setting Native - Newly-composed ballads - Folk song revival “BARBARA ALLEN”: SCOTTISH ROOTS Based on a 17th-century Scottish ballad Emotional core Barbara Allen: Imported versions and variants LISTEN: H. J. Beeker version - w/ guitar accompaniment LISTEN: May Kennedy McCord version - Solo voice LISTEN: Pete Seeger version 1
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
GMUS 203: Music in America Lecture 3: Ballads and Folk Music NATURALIZED BALLADS “The Gypsie Laddie” (Scottish) becomes “Gypsy Davy” (U.S.)
Background image of page 2
Image of page 3
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 10/22/2009 for the course MUSIC 203 taught by Professor Dr.connell during the Fall '09 term at James Madison University.

Page1 / 3

Lecture 3 outline - GMUS 203: Music in America Lecture 3:...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 3. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online