Brief Description of Video and Image Formats

Brief Description of Video and Image Formats - Brief...

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Brief Description of Video and Image Formats Digital Video D1 - is a component format. The extremely high cost of D1 recorders limits their use to only the very elite production facilities that incorporate many special effects with multiple layering of the video signal. Such special effects layering does not degrade the image quality in the pure D1 digital environment. While most professional grade digital video is sampled at a rate of 4:2:2, or 4 samples of Y, 2 of (R-Y), 2 of (B-Y), D1 is 4:2:2:4. This 4:2:2:4 sampling permits an alpha (transparency, or linear keying) channel to be recorded. (Sampling Ratio 4:2:2:4; max. Data Rate= 270Mbps; Bits Per Sample= 8 or 10; Compression= none) D2 - This is a composite format, but the quality is so high that signal degradation due to the mixing of video information is kept to a minimum. D2 is not a pure digital format, as the inputs and outputs are standard analog composite ports. Although this may degrade the digital signal somewhat, it does offer the advantage of integrating D2 with other existing equipment. Professional composite recorders use 4:0:0, because they sample the composite picture-imbedded colors and all-4 times, then 4 more times, etc. Since there are no color components, to sample, the other numbers are zero. (Sampling Ratio 4:0:0; max. Data Rate= 143Mbps; Bits Per Sample= 8; Compression= none). D3 - D3 is also a composite format like D2. (Sampling Ratio 4:0:0; max. Data Rate= 143Mbps; Bits Per Sample= 8; Compression= none) D5 - This is a component format rather than composite. D5 is the newest digital format and its common use and acceptance have yet to be determined. All digital formats on this page sample the Y component at 13.5 MHz but D5 is switchable to 18 MHz for HDTV. (Sampling Ratio 4:2:2; max. Data Rate= 170Mbps; Bits Per Sample= 10; Compression= none) Digital Betacam - This is the most commonly used video format in post production due to excellent picture reproduction and reasonable cost.(Sampling Ratio 4:2:2; max. Data Rate= 90Mbps; Bits Per Sample= 10; Compression= 2:1) DVCPRO50 - Panasonic's DVCPRO50 use two DV codecs, thereby doubling the data rate to 50 Mbps. (Sampling Ratio 4:2:2; max. Data Rate= 50Mbps; Bits Per Sample= 8; Compression= 3.3:1*) DV (DV25) - This is the lesser of the 'low-end' DV formats. MiniDV consumer cameras are the least desireable. I will only give specs for the more ‘professional’ forms of DV25. DVCAM**
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This note was uploaded on 10/22/2009 for the course VIS 262 taught by Professor Keithj.sanborn during the Spring '08 term at Princeton.

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Brief Description of Video and Image Formats - Brief...

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