Psychology_ch6

Psychology_ch6 - Ch 6 States of Consciousness Consciousness...

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Ch 6– States of Consciousness Consciousness – awareness of various cognitive processes like sleeping, dreaming, * Varies according to how aware we are of processes 1) Waking consciousness – includes all the thoughts, feelings, and perceptions that occur when we are awake and reasonably alert. 2) Altered states of consciousness – a mental state that differs noticeably from normal waking consciousness (being drunk, sleeping) Explaining Waking Consciousness Historical Views First: consciousness was psychology’s primary concern Fell out of favor in early 20 th century. Focus on observable behavior instead (behaviorism) 1960s – Don’t like behaviorism -> alternative states of consciousness, rise in cognitive psychology, neuroscience Sleep and Dreams Altered state of consciousness : Sleep - characterized by reduction in voluntary body movement and decreased awareness of surroundings Sleep is necessary! (disease : fatal insomnia) Sleep deprivation as torture/interrogation Everyone sleeps How long organisms sleep, where, in what positions, and other details vary from species to species. Large animals sleep less than small animals, perhaps takes longer for big guy to eat enough to be full Sleeping and waking follow a daily, circadian cycle 1
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The Rhythm of Sleep Circadian Rhythm Your brain thinks you’re older than y o u are. It keeps track of how many hrs of daylight you’re exposed to. Now we wake earlier than before and sleep later than before. Girls have puberty earlier. Sleep/waking follow a daily, or circadian , cycle. Adaptation to the 24-hour solar cycle of light and dark, found in all living organisms The human biological clock is actually a tiny cluster of neurons in the hypothalamus – the suprachiasmatic nuclei - that responds to the activation of light-sensitive retinal proteins Causes pineal gland to alter release of melatonin (released at dusk, lowers body temp and makes you sleepy) Longer you’re awake -> more adenosine you have Sleep Stages Going to sleep” As measured by an EEG, brain waves during this twilight state are characterized by irregular, low-voltage alpha waves – relatively slow brain waves of a relaxed, awake stage Stage 1 Pulse slows, muscle relaxation, rolling of eyes Tight, low amplitude brain waves, resembling those recorded when a person is alert or excited Wake up easily, might not be able to tell if you’re asleep Stage 2: Short rhythmic bursts of activity called sleep spindles periodically appear (obviously asleep) 2
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Heart rate, blood pressure, and temperature continue to drop Hard to awaken Stage 3, delta waves – slow waves with high peaks Heart rate, blood pressure, and temperature continue to drop Hard to awaken Stage 4 sleep – the brain emits VERY slow delta waves. Heart rate, breathing rate, blood pressure, and body temperature are as low as they will
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This note was uploaded on 10/22/2009 for the course PSYCH 2000 taught by Professor Domangue during the Fall '08 term at LSU.

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Psychology_ch6 - Ch 6 States of Consciousness Consciousness...

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