cs245-w05-nday-midterm-exam-soln

cs245-w05-nday-midterm-exam-soln - University of Waterloo...

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University of Waterloo Midterm Examination SOLUTION SET Term: Winter Year: 2005 Student Name UW Student ID Number Course Abbreviation and Number CS 245 Course Title Logic and Computation Sections SE112 - 001 and CS245 - 001, 002, 003 Instructor Shalini Aggarwal, Nancy Day Date of Exam Thursday, February 10, 2005 Time Period Start time: 4:30 p.m. End time: 6:30 p.m. Duration of Exam 2 hours Number of Exam Pages 12 pages (including this cover sheet) Exam Type Closed book Additional Materials Allowed NO ADDITIONAL MATERIALS ALLOWED Write your name and student number at the bottom of every page. Write all solutions on the exam. The booklets are for scratch work. There are blank truth tables on the last page for use with any question. Good luck everyone! Question Mark Max Marker Question Mark Max Marker 1 5 7 9 2 5 8 6 3 7 9 9 4 12 10 14 5 9 11 11 6 13 Total 100 Name UW Student ID (page 1 of 12)
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1 (5 Marks) Short Answer 1. Can transformational proof be used to show an argument in propositional logic is valid? If so, what do you prove in transformational proof about an argument of the form p q where p and q may be compound formulas? If not, explain why. Yes, transformational proof can be used to show an argument is valid. You would prove p q ⇚⇛ true . 2. If ¬ a is a contingent formula in propositional logic, which of the following describes a ? satisfiable, contingent 3. What is the name of the argument forms identified by Aristotle? Syllogisms 4. What is the problem with using a proof procedure that is not sound? If a proof procedure is not sound then it might be possible to prove an argument is valid when it is not. 5. What must be true about a set of propositional logic formulas in order to be able to use natural deduction to prove the set is consistent? We can use natural deduction to show a set of formulas is consistent if and only if the con- junction of the formulas is a tautology.
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