{[ promptMessage ]}

Bookmark it

{[ promptMessage ]}

Chapter 3 Summary - Chapter3Summary .Synesthesiaisthe...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–2. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Chapter 3 Summary Sensation  allows us to receive information from the world around us.   Synesthesia  is the  rare condition in which a person experiences more than one sensation from a single stimulus,  for example the person who can hear and see a sound.  Outside stimuli (such as the sound of  your mother’s voice) activate  sensory receptors  which convert the outside stimulus into a  message that our nervous system can understand – electrical and chemical signals.  The  process of converting the outside stimulus into the electrical-chemical signal of the nervous  system is called sensory  transduction .  The sensory receptors are specialized forms of  neurons and make up part of our somatic nervous system.  Ernst Weber and Gustav Fechner  were two pioneers in the study of sensory thresholds.  Weber studied the smallest difference  between two stimuli that a person could detect 50 percent of the time.  He called this difference  just noticeable difference (jnd)  and he discovered that the jnd is always a constant.  For  instance, if a person needs to add 5 percent more weight to notice the difference in the  heaviness of a package, then this person’s jnd is 5 percent.  If the initial weight of the package  is 10 lbs, then 0.5 lbs would need to be added to detect a difference (5 percent of 10 lb = 0.5lb).  If the initial weight is 100 lbs than 5 lbs would need to be added in order for the person to detect  a difference in weight (5 percent of 100 lb = 5 lb).  The fact that the jnd is always a constant is  known as Weber’s law.   Fechner investigated the lowest level of a stimulus that a person could  detect 50 percent of the time.  He called this level the  absolute threshold .   Habituation  and  sensory adaptation  are two methods our body uses to ignore unchanging information.  Habituation takes place when the lower centers of the brain prevent conscious attention to a  constant stimulus, such as the humming of a desktop computer.  Sensory adaptation occurs in  the sensory receptors themselves when the receptors stop responding to a constant stimulus,  such as the feeling of your shirt on your skin.  The visual sensory system is activated by light waves.  There are three psychological  aspects to our experience of light.   Brightness  is determined by the height, or amplitude, of the  wave.   Color , or hue, is determined by the length of the light wave, and  saturation , or purity, is  determined by the mixture of wavelengths of varying heights and lengths.  Light enters your eye 
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Image of page 2
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}