A study in instability The Little Black Boy Deconstructs Itself

A study in instability The Little Black Boy Deconstructs Itself

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A study in instability: The Little Black Boy Deconstructs Itself Literary works, such as poetry, rarely claim to suggest that equality is unattainable and inequality is the necessary condition in which we all must live. The ideal of achieving equality in life is a far more widely used message in literature. Since this is the case, readers are easily swayed to find the latter meaning in a text, however the same words that a reader may use to determine this could also be used to deliver the contradictory message that equality is unattainable. Upon first reading the poem, The Little Black Boy , the reader is pacified with the apparently overt message of equality through God. The message of equality is propagated by phrases such as, “but O! my soul is white; white as an angel is the English child,” or “round the tent of God like lambs we joy.” A closer look at the first part of the first phrase contained in line two of stanza one of this poem, “And I am black, but O! my soul is white;” reveals the use of diametrically opposed color words. The last phrase in stanza one is, “But I am black as if bereav’d of light.” The opposition to equality is established in the first stanza of the poem. The use of the word “black” brings with it connotations of darkness, “bad guys”
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This note was uploaded on 10/23/2009 for the course ENG 394 taught by Professor Emily during the Summer '06 term at Converse.

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A study in instability The Little Black Boy Deconstructs Itself

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