Classism Manifested in A Rose for Emily

Classism Manifested in A Rose for Emily - Classism...

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Classism Manifested in A Rose for Emily Classism refers to an analysis of class structures, both ideological and as they actually exist. This paper focuses on a few particular examples of classism from a Marxist perspective in a specific text. The substructure of “class” perseveres as a part of the larger hegemony of structures inherent in our society. The influential “upper class” is composed of people in various positions of power and wielding differing degrees of authority based on their given status. Class references considered within the context of our specific ideology can help us to understand the dynamics of a piece of literature. In A Rose for Emily , a short story written by William Faulkner in 1931, we are invited to criticize the classism represented. Faulkner allows the reader to see the strife between the community’s older generation and their ideology and the younger generation and their evolving version of that ideology. We continually see the forces of the two groups rising and falling in a grand struggle, trying to reach a point of concession, which will allow the ideology to finally evolve without disrupting the existing power structures.
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This note was uploaded on 10/23/2009 for the course ENG 394 taught by Professor Emily during the Summer '06 term at Converse.

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Classism Manifested in A Rose for Emily - Classism...

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