Two Patterns, Two Spheres A Feminist reading of “The Yellow Wallpaper”

Two Patterns, Two Spheres A Feminist reading of “The Yellow Wallpaper”

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Two Patterns, Two Spheres: A Feminist reading of “The Yellow Wallpaper” The 1892 short story, The Yellow Wallpaper , written by Charlotte Perkins Gilman, has been taught over and over again as an example of feminist literature. Gilman uses setting in this story to lead her readers and indicate multiple meanings. The post- structuralism and deconstructionism idea of differance leads directly into Kristeva’s added dimension of fluidity and slipperiness of language known as the semiotic. Gilman uses the inherent multiple meanings in her word choices to intentionally play with her readers. She illustrates the doctrine of two spheres commonly used to keep women in their place by slightly embellishing her own personal post-partum experience. Gilman uses word associations and connotations to paint a fluid and changing picture. Gilman creates the idea of the two spheres without ever mentioning it with statements such as, “ . . . he takes all care from me, and so I feel basely ungrateful not to
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Two Patterns, Two Spheres A Feminist reading of “The Yellow Wallpaper”

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