12-4-07%20-%20Lecture%2021%20-%20Chapter%205

Lectur - Liquids Solids Liquids Solids& Intermolecular Forces& Intermolecular Forces WHY WHY • Why is water usually a liquid and not a gas

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Unformatted text preview: Liquids, Solids Liquids, Solids & Intermolecular Forces & Intermolecular Forces WHY? WHY? • Why is water usually a liquid and not a gas? • Why does liquid water boil at such a high temperature for such a small molecule? • Why does ice float on water? • Why are NaCl crystals little cubes? • Why is I 2 a solid whereas Cl 2 is a gas? Inter- Inter- molecular molecular Forces Forces We have studied INTRA- molecular forces—the forces holding atoms together to form molecules (covalent bonds). Now we turn to forces between molecules — INTER molecular forces. Forces between molecules, between ions, or between molecules and ions. Intermolecular Forces Intermolecular Forces London Forces London Forces Formation of a dipole in two nonpolar enthane (CH 3 CH 3 ) molecules. London Forces and electrons London Forces and electrons The magnitude of the induced dipole depends on the tendency to be distorted (polarizability)....
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This note was uploaded on 10/24/2009 for the course CHEM 234234234 taught by Professor Johnson during the Fall '08 term at UCSD.

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Lectur - Liquids Solids Liquids Solids& Intermolecular Forces& Intermolecular Forces WHY WHY • Why is water usually a liquid and not a gas

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