Steel Lecture 3

Steel Lecture 3 - TOPIC 5: CONNECTIONS - LECTURE NOTES...

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CIVL2007 Theory and Design of Structures II Steel Component (11 May 2007) page 55 TOPIC 5: CONNECTIONS - LECTURE NOTES - Unless otherwise noted, all clauses cited in this lecture have been taken from Chapter 9 of the Hong Kong Code of Practice for the Structural use of Steel (2005) {otherwise known as HK Steel Code (2005)}. General Structural members will need to be joined or connected together is some form in virtually any structure. An important area of steel design is therefore the design and detailing of such connections. The design must make sure the connections are capable of withstanding the forces and movements with which they are subjected to. Where possible, eccentricity caused between the centroid of the connection and the member/s faming into it must be minimised. However, ff not possible, then the eccentricity effect must be taken into account in design of the connection. Detailing of the connections should take into account possible dimensional variations caused by rolling tolerances and fabrication variations which may lead to a small degree of lack of fit. In this subject the following types of connections (non-preloaded) will be considered: - bolted connections, and - welded connections. Figure 5.1. Bolted Connection
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CIVL2007 Theory and Design of Structures II Steel Component (11 May 2007) page 56 Bolted Connections (9.3) Failure Modes Bolted connections can be designed according to their mode of failure. They may fail in five different modes, namely: 1. Tearing (tension failure) at the net section of either plates. 2. Shear failure of the edge plate, (shearing of the plate beyond the end bolt), 3. Shearing of the bolt, 4. Bearing failure of bolt, and 5. Bearing failure of the plate immediately behind the bolt. Bolted Connection Failures Figure 5.2. Bolted Connection Failures
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CIVL2007 Theory and Design of Structures II Steel Component (11 May 2007) page 58 Bolted Connection Failures: Continued Figure 5.3a. Bearing Ffailure (Single bolt) Figure 5.3b. Bearing Failure (Double bolt) Figure 5.4: End Pull-Out Figure 5.5. Net Section Failure and Bearing Failure (Double bolt)
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CIVL2007 Theory and Design of Structures II Steel Component (11 May 2007) page 59 Bolt Spacing (9.3.1) Minimum spacing requirement between bolts parallel to the direction of loading: = 2.5d, where d = nominal diameter of bolt. Minimum spacing requirement between bolts to the direction of loading: = 3d (this spacing can be 2.5d if bearing is less than of the bearing capacity, P bb ) Maximum spacing requirement between bolts parallel or to the direction of loading : = min (12t, 150mm), where t is the thickness of the thinner connected plate. End and Edge Distances (9.3.2) The edge distance is defined as the distance from the centre of the hole to the adjacent edge in which the fastener bears. Maximum edge distance
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Steel Lecture 3 - TOPIC 5: CONNECTIONS - LECTURE NOTES...

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