RC Lecture 5

RC Lecture 5 - TOPIC 6: ONE-WAY CONTINUOUS SLABS - LECTURE...

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CIVL2007 Theory and Design of Structures II RC Component (13 April 2007) page 97 TOPIC 6: ONE-WAY CONTINUOUS SLABS - LECTURE NOTES - Details of the assignment worth 15% of the assessment mark for this subject is contained on the last page of these notes General A suspended slab is generally a thin planar member that transmits transverse loads by bending action to its supports. Suspended slabs are commonly used in floor systems in modern buildings such as car parking stations, warehouses, office blocks, apartment buildings, shopping centres and schools. Concrete slabs can also be used in bridge decks (Warner et al. 1998). Non-suspended slabs are slabs that may bear directly on ground. This course is concerned with the design of suspended slabs. This course will address one-way slabs while TD2 will address two-way slabs. More specifically, this lecture will address the ultimate limit state design of continuous one-way spanning solid slabs in flexure (and shear) in accordance with Chapter 6 of the Hong Kong Code of Practice for the Structural use of Concrete (2004). Figure 1. RC Building under Construction: What type of slab system is being used? The Hong Kong Code of Practice for the Structural use of Concrete (2004) is available for viewing at: http://www.bd.gov.hk/english/documents/index_crlist.html
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CIVL2007 Theory and Design of Structures II RC Component (13 April 2007) page 98 One- and Two-Way Slabs One-way slabs act structurally in one direction while two way slabs act structurally in two directions. Figure 2. One-Way and Two-Way Slabs (Warner et al. 1998) One-Way Slabs and Beams One-way slabs act structurally as wide beams with primary bending occurring in one-direction. As a result, the main reinforcement is placed in the longitudinal direction. Much of the theory of beams can be applied to one-way spanning slabs. Figure 3. One-Way Slabs and Beams (modified from Warner et al. 1998) 1 m wide beam
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CIVL2007 Theory and Design of Structures II RC Component (13 April 2007) page 99 Different Slabs Systems Figure 4. Floor Systems (Warner et al. 1998)
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CIVL2007 Theory and Design of Structures II RC Component (13 April 2007) page 100 Figure 5. Plan View of Beam and Girder Floor System (Park and Gamble 2000) Figure 6. Arrangement of Waffle Slabs (a) as a Flat Slab, (b) as a Two-Way Slab (Park and Gamble 2000)
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CIVL2007 Theory and Design of Structures II RC Component (13 April 2007) page 101 Analysis There are several methods available for the calculation of the moments, shears and stresses throughout a continuous one-way slab. The HK RC Code (2004) permits the use of a simplified method of analysis to determine the moments and shears which is based on tabulated expressions. These coefficients are based on the assumption of a 20% moment redistribution. The simplified method is particularly suitable for slabs which are rectangular in plan, or can be approximated to rectangular shapes. Slabs which are not rectangular in plan may be analysed by techniques
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This note was uploaded on 10/24/2009 for the course BENG Civl2007 taught by Professor A.smith during the Spring '09 term at HKU.

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RC Lecture 5 - TOPIC 6: ONE-WAY CONTINUOUS SLABS - LECTURE...

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