School Counseling Colalborative Model COSC 660 .docx -...

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Running Head: SCHOOL COUNSELING COLLABORATIVE MODEL School Counseling Collaborative Model Liberty University Madyson Scott 1
SCHOOL COUNSELING COLLABORATIVE MODEL Component #1: Professional Identity The professional identity of the professional school counselor has existed for over a hundred years and has undergone many changes over the years. Many of the philosophical methods and ideas can be traced back to ancient history (Erford, 2019). According to Schimmel (2008), counseling was developed in response to the Industrial Revolution. In the past, school counselors were considered teachers, elders, or advisors who supported students. During this time, teachers were given no extra pay for their dual roles. The main responsibility for teachers was to provide placement in available positions because working was the ultimate goal. It was not until 1965 when the profession of a counselor changed. The Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA) funded counseling in primary and secondary schools. The role of school counselors today is to support students through guidance lessons, counseling services, and individual counseling. The American School Counseling Association (ASCA) National Model, American Counseling Association (ACA), and the Transforming School Counseling Initiative (TSCI) have assisted in determining the roles and functionalities of school counselors. School counselors were once viewed as being vocational, however, they are now viewed as comprehensive. The National Standards for School Counseling Programs mentioned how school counseling programs should promote three areas of counseling development: career development, academic development, and social-emotional development (Erford, 2019). The professional school counselor is viewed as an important stakeholder in the success of all students. In today’s society, a school counselor performs a dual role as both an educator and a counselor. This role is multi-dimensional because a counselor may be a leader, consultant, a collaborator, or an advocate for change. According to Erford (2019), it is important to note that, depending on the school community’s needs and the skills of the professional school 2
SCHOOL COUNSELING COLLABORATIVE MODEL counselor, some of these roles may predominate in a given school or even at certain times of the school year. An example that would illustrate the components would be closing the achievement gap. According to ASCA (2016), B-SS 5. states, “Consult to support student achievement and success (p.2). B-SS 6. states, “Collaborate with families, teachers, administrators, other school staff and education stakeholders for student achievement and success (p. 2). B-PA 2. states, “Identify gaps in achievement…” (ASCA, 2016, p. 2). The gaps would be shown by collecting data to be analyzed. The data collected would consist of attendance, discipline, and opportunities for improvement and achievement (ASCA, 2016). In order to close the achievement gap, school counselors would need to develop an action plan. Developing an action plan would challenge

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